Pecos Bill~The Premier

Saint Coffee
Alarm Bell

Warning Bell

Can’t see the numbers?  They’re at least three inches tall.  I couldn’t see them either…at eight o’clock this morning…with my eyes shut tight while I banged around on the damn thing trying to shut off the warning siren.  Sometime before daylight, I heard Boy opening the garage door.  That part was not unusual.  He forgets stuff and comes in the mornings to fetch it.  I wondered if he’d remember to close the garage door.  Then it happened.  I vaguely recognized the voice somewhere near my bed ordering me to be at a school play at ten o’clock.  Ten o’clock?  That’s past any kid’s bedtime.  I went back to sleep.

 

Saint Coffee

Saint Coffee

Know what a Coffee Saint looks like?  This one saved me from daylight shock on my trip to the premier of Pecos Bill.  She’s one of my McDonald’s girls.  I worry about her thumb.  This morning, I worried about my ability to get from her to the Way-Off-Broadway production.  I’ll worry about the thumb later.  We already discussed it three times.  She does not follow my instructions.  She says she needs the money.  The swollen thumb is the price she pays to get it.  She has two children under five years old.  And she smiles anyway.

 

Pecos Bill~The Premier

Pecos Bill~The Premier

By the time I staggered into the church school cafeteria and fell into a folding chair, I cursed Apple for the magnitude of their discrimination.  Against Old People.  No VR on an iPhone that costs an arm and a leg?  S.H.I.T. as my mother used to spell in a little whisper under her breath.  I forgot the camera.  This would have to do.  I clicked about fifty times praying (it is a church) to accidentally get one photograph I could make out the characters in.  This one is the best of the lot.  Maybe it was the coffee.

Boy is the tall chuck wagon cook in the long apron and neck kerchief.  The one trying to hide behind the curtain despite my frantic arm motions for him to move over for the photo op.  After all, he was the one who ordered me to be there in the first place.  Basically, the story line includes a really humorous scene in which Boy and his co-chef (who wore Boy’s hat for some reason) tell the cowhands and the cowgirls what’s on the menu.  Beans and more Beans.  The disgruntled cow hands lament long and loudly.  The cooks tell them if they don’t want Beans for supper, it’s okay.  They can have Beans for breakfast.  Another round of loud wailing.  Finally, it’s decided that some lovely cowgirl will go for pizza.  All ends well.

I could never figure out how the character who kept peeking out of the folds in the stage curtains fit into the story.  I forgot to adjust my hearing aids so I won’t blame the director for this seeming incongruity.  At any rate, he looked remarkably like Groucho Marx.  Not a bad touch for any play.  And the kids had the vernacular and the phonology down pat!  I was astounded.  They could teach professional actors how to sound like real cowboys.

Director’s Note:   “This little play is an exercise in oral reading.  The books are supposed to be there.”

The reward for all the suffering came at the very end.  As the kids filed out, Boy stopped and put his arms around me.  He looked up into my eyes and said simply, “I love you, Granny!”

26 Comments on “Pecos Bill~The Premier

  1. I love your McDonald’s photo series. Good for you for making these guys and girls feel special when they serve you. As for the play. My grandparents came to so many of my plays all the way through college. It made a big difference in my life

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    • Thanks, Michael. Those kids were like family to me. They were typical young people on their way to their lives. I saw them as having paused there for a moment. It was all in good fun. They asked and I snapped. We had a good time.

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    • I do not recall ever having been in a play of any sort in school. The closest I came to a life onstage was to dress up in burlap sacks and join a group of friends to sing “Davy Crockett” in a talent contest. I don’t sing.

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  2. Priceless! I went back through and to look at the pictures again because I was enjoying the story so much. It is understandable why you are so loved!

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    • Elisa, every grandmother on earth does the same things I do. I just tell the story for the other grandmothers who are there. We are the same.

      I’m glad you enjoyed the story! It was a good day for me.

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  3. You made me smile with your morning traffic… Should be so nice to watch these little artists! I try to imagine… “Pecos Bill”… They all seem so nice, reminded me my son’s play when he was a little boy… But the most beautiful part is the final; “I love you, Granny”… Blessing and Happiness for you all, Thank you, with my love, nia

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    • You know “Pecos Bill” is a cowboy story. I don’t know any more about it than that myself. As I told costalcrone, I can’t use the camera unless I have something to steady my arms on…like the car window frame this morning at McDonald’s. It’s frustrating, but you all are so kind to accept my blurred photos. And I am just shameless enough to post them! 🙂 I know you guys understand. And I am grateful. How wonderful it is to be accepted even with limitations and less than perfect photographs! Thank you, Nia. The best part really was at the end of the play!

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  4. Grandsons are wonderful! Mine is in college but I still get hugs and “I love you” in front of friends. What a special morning you had – priceless. I am a coffee addict too but can’t drive myself anywhere in the morning without it. Sleep in tomorrow!

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    • I am not supposed to drink caffeine, period. I have a familial tremor in my right hand. I can photograph with a camera or the phone if I have something to steady my arms on. I was able to get an iPhone picture of the girl at Micky D’s because I could rest my arms on the car window frame. I just cannot hold the phone steady without support as you can see from the play photo.

      My daughter had Boy ten years later than I had her so I’m old now to have an 8-yr-old grandson. The women in our family always had their children late and only one or two of them. We are a small family as the result. I am glad to hear my sweet Boy won’t give up the hugs as he grows up!

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    • Oh, Shimon! You old curmudgeon! You know perfectly well you could never manage without Nechama! 😉

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    • Ana, I’m glad you enjoyed it. The play was perfectly executed. And by third-grade kids too. I was impressed. It was worth getting out of bed, after all. 🙂

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  5. I LOVE the face peeking out of the curtain!

    In, fact I love this entire story. Thanks for inviting us along. Any story is a good one when it ends in ‘awwwwe!’

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    • ALEX!!! Why didn’t you tell me I misspelled “Marx”! I just saw an email from my sister telling me how funny she thought the mistake was. I asked Boy after school about the kid and the curtain. He said it was not part of the play. He had no idea who it was. That was my favorite part too. I couldn’t stop watching for him to stick his head back out. I hope he still got to go outside for recess! Ha Ha… That school is pretty strict.

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      • I didn’t notice! I was too busy looking at the kid. That’s too funny that it was not part of the play. I can’t help but laugh every time I look at him.

        He reminds me of a friend’s 10 year old who I took to his school play because his father had to work. I asked the boy, Jack, to do something so I would be able to clearly spot him on stage, since he and all the children would be in costume. Without telling anyone, he decided I would easily spot him if he were wearing socks….his dad’s business socks! So there he was onstage as Peter Pan….wearing black business socks! It was hilarious, and quite endearing to me….his teacher was not amused!

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        • Oh, how funny! And how creative of the kid to think of it. Teachers have no sense of humor!

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            • Smart Dad. Teaching junior to work the system. Ha Ha. I like both of them!

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  6. I laughed my butt off at the plot and your colorful recounting of the story line…and then ended with a “Awwwww”. You know of course not many boys that age would stop and hug their Grannie and tell her she is loved in front of his friends. He will grow to be a man of his own…thinking for himself and with a sweet and loving spirit. That is “Sue’s Prediction”.

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    • It is odd that he is so open about things like that. The other boys were waiting to go on. They didn’t seem to think it was strange. He is a sweet, sensitive child. The funny thing was how he put the clock on the pillow as close to me as the cord would stretch. He was afraid I wouldn’t hear it, I’m sure. His dad didn’t know there was a play. Not many parents were there.

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    • Yep, Scott, he’s a really sweet child. And he adores his Granny….as she adores him, of course! Nobody else could have persuaded this nocturnal old woman out of her bed that early in the day!

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