Slate Patterns

My house floors are covered in twelve-inch square slabs of slate.  There are hundreds of them all the way from the front door throughout the house, onto the porch, on the walkway into the pergola.  All slate and each piece different.  I am accustomed to looking at the patterns.  It occurred to me today that the patterns would be a nice texture for something.  For you guys who use textures in your art and photography, their textures and colors might be useful. I chose the slates with the most pattern and color here.  There are lots of monochrome, less patterned ones too.  If you like the idea and don’t have slate floors, any flooring company or brick yard should have them.  Take a spray bottle of water along since the pieces you find may be dull and dusty. These photos were shot after a rain at night so they have distracting light reflections that wouldn’t be a problem in daylight.

22 Comments on “Slate Patterns

  1. Wonderful natural abstracts. They would also make intriguing textures. 🙂

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    • Slate has such interesting patterns when it is viewed through a macro lens. I compare the patterns to cumulus cloud formations. We all see something different in the patterns. Glad you enjoyed them.

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  2. These photographs are so varied. In each one I see something different–Islands in a gleaming ocean, red rock country dotted with juniper, pine trees on a snowy mountain, satellite photos of a river running through the desert. They are truly beautiful.

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    • These aren’t really very good. There are fantastic patterns in slate. It’s kind of like looking at clouds. We all see something there. Try photographing them sometime with a macro lens. I had fun. I’m glad you liked them. I appreciate your taking the time to talk about them! Thanks!

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  3. Did you know that red and blue slate are the principal growing soils in Germany for great Riesling? I love slate for this reason and the colors add to my joy. Cool shots 🙂

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  4. Wow–we have the same, exactly, though ours are 20″ square, and yes, run through the entire house, top to bottom, including bathrooms up the walls and floor to ceiling fireplace feature. Only a couple of rooms don’t have slate, including my studio. Growing up, we lived on the Vermont/NYS border in a slate-producing area, where all the roofs and even sidewalks were slate. Almost every house had it inside, too–but it was a cold, blueish-toned slate–even the reds felt blue–and never made me feel good; just sort of ‘blue’ (smile). But when we found our present house here in British Columbia, and saw it literally carpetted in the slate you show here, I fell in love. It is a warm, earthy, wonderfully enclosing, riverbed kind of stone. And I was told that it is this way because rather than bring it in from New England or Wales, it’s origins are Chinese where the earth is ruddier, browner.

    The only thing about it which I find a bit unnerving is working in the kitchen, or carrying vases and setting the table. Should I drop a bottle, or glass, that baby is GONE–shattered. The same goes for TV remotes in the living room. And yes, many many times I’ve sat on the throne and looked down at it remarking to myself what a great jumping-off for getting into abstracts.

    Thank you for posting this, m’dear. I am so pleased to know we share a similar joy beneath our feet!

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    • I love slate, but I don’t think it is for everybody. I’ve had ceramic tile and now granite counter tops in the kitchen and bathrooms for years. You get used to NOT dropping things. 😉 I no longer notice it or worry about dropping things. I guess I’m a cave dweller at heart…

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    • By the way, I will allow abstracts only if you do not paint blobs or ugly squares that mean absolutely nothing and look as if somebody turned a child loose with too much watercolor! As I took these photos, I realized what wonderful patterns there are in slate. I could see rivers and mountains and even my “faces”. Please do give us something remotely identifiable! 😉

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      • Well, I likely won’t. Abstracts are too nerve-wracking because a good one must be held in perfect balance, yet maintain a perfect tension. I’m a wound-up enough personality as it is when it comes to painting. It’s not something I do to relax. For relaxation I do gardening (smile). BTW, I am cutting way back on posting because I am doing much-too-much blogging and not doing enough painting. But I will always stop by here for a shot of Jim Beam and a story.

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  5. Isn’t it great to experiment with a macro lens?! I can see how you could have tons of fun with these slabs of slate. I like the last one in the series the best.

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    • Yes, it is fun. I like the black and white ones best too. The b&w one here is the same as the colored one (second from top). These aren’t very good photos, but I posted them anyway. I’m shameless like that, you know!

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  6. I have always loved slate… and never thought about using it as a texture before. I am still very inexperienced with textures, but it’s a great idea.

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    • I almost deleted this post. I felt kind of silly when I thought about it. Of course, I have just discovered the textures of things with my new macro lens. I like textures, but I have no idea what to do with them. Elmediat uses lots of them, I think, in his graphics work. Of course, he knows “everything”, I think! 🙂

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      • I am glad you didn’t delete it. My son has been encouraging me to take shots of, and to make my own textures… but I still don’t really know how to use them properly either 😀

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