Thank You, Michael

Michael awarded me this honor several weeks ago.  I promised to follow the rules.  I will do the best I can, Michael.  Thank you for your gracious award and for your Mother Teresa speech.  I love you.  You can find the thoroughly mischievous Michael at http://blissfuladventurer.wordpress.com.

And the rules are:

  • Thank and link to the person who awarded you.
  • Share seven random facts about yourself.
  • Pass the award on to more blogging friends.
  • Contact those friends with the link and congratulate them!
  • Post your award with pride.
Thank you, Michael.  I fully intend to express my gratitude further by sending the very best bottle of wine I can find at the H.E.B. Grocery Store.
Seven Rather Random Things You Know About Me Already Or Have Guessed By Now:
1.    CT Scan of my brain on blogging (the happy equivalent of a garage mop):
2.  The little girl who writes this blog.  She really does.  The same little girl who reported to her first grade teacher that some of the kids had their eyes open during the morning prayer.  Mrs. Lattimore told the story to my mother and me at a visit to her home when she was very elderly.  She said she never forgot those curious eyes.  She was being very nicely euphemistic, of course.
3.  I made concrete septic tanks.  Yes, from scratch.  Lots of them starting in 1979.  Dean and I started a company called Victoria Precision Products, Inc.  We bought ready-mix cement back then from a local plant.  It was delivered and poured into steel forms. A neighbor boy and I directed the pouring, vibrated the mix with hand-held stick vibrators so it filled the area around the core of the form equally, leveled the top, inserted the steel rebar at precisely the correct angles to provide strength and sprayed the tanks with water to prevent fast drying cracks when it was too hot.  There are many other details involved in making a concrete tank, but that is way TMI for this post.  Suffice it to say that I lost twenty pounds that first summer working on a concrete slab in the sun.
4.  I was an English teacher in a public school in the little mountain town of Marion, North Carolina for five years after college.
5.  I was a social worker for years, in Marion and in Greensboro, North Carolina, and later in Victoria, Texas before I quit to go into business with my husband.
6.  I am nocturnal like Che.  We stay up all night and sleep all day.
7.  My seventieth birthday will happen on May 21, 2012 regardless of any opinion I might have about it.  I deeply regret my failure to commission a portrait to commemorate the occasion.  However, I offer a watercolor portrait of one of my previous seventieth birthdays.  The link will take you to the charming story behind the portrait.  It is far more interesting than my present birthday will be, no doubt.
Now, for the impossible.  How to nominate people for this award?  I don’t follow people who are not interesting and versatile and funny and bright.  Those people inspire and astound and amuse and entertain and educate me.  All of you.  I know everybody says that, but it’s probably true for everybody who says it.  It’s certainly true for me.  Everyone I know has received numerous awards and/or would be grateful not to receive another one.  I suppose I will pick at random and hope you will simply do with it whatever you like.  Nothing is required of you.   I wish I knew some new bloggers whom I could encourage, but I have been remiss in checking them out.  Sigh…    Perhaps, you know someone who could use an award.  When I thought about the awards some of you have been kind enough to bestow on me, I remember my first post here.  It was a NASA picture of the day.  No text.  Nothing.  I was testing the water.  For a long time, nobody liked or commented on my posts.  Then a couple of you started hitting the like button.  I suppose I was encouraged enough to keep posting.  I told myself that my posts would be a record of things I thought about or enjoyed.  A record to pass along to my grandson.  Most of you are young.  You are still making your way in the world.  Approval is more important to you as is exposure of your wonderful work.  I wish I could publish all of you.  If I Were A Rich ManYa ha deedle deedle, bubba bubba deedle deedle dum, that’s precisely what I would do.  And what fun that would be!

  Heifer 12×12  ( http://heifer12x12.com/)   Twelve countries in twelve months.  Beautiful photography and lots and lots of information.

Lady D   Splatter (Drips and Drops of Everyday Life)  can be found at   http://marilynkaydennis.wordpress.com
   “Lady D” is an intellectual giant.  She is a thoroughly kind and decent human being too.  There is no blog like hers.
     KofeGeek   (http://kofegeek.wordpress.com)  This young woman is a genius.  Period.  While you are there, don’t miss her KofeArt gallery of illustrations.
     http://kofeart.wordpress.com/category/sketch/   “Moty The Big Nose” is my favorite character.  She has won many prizes for her illustrations.
There are so many more of you.  However, if I don’t publish this thing right now, I never will.  This is the post in which I could not fix the little thumbnails to the right place on the side.  If I touch one, I know they’ll all fly right back where they were!  I don’t dare to try to add even ONE MORE.

37 Comments on “Thank You, Michael

  1. George — thanks SO much for the great recognition on your blog, and I’m so happy that I finally got to see it!! I love your writing, and of course, your photos are splendid, which makes it all the more meaningful that you like mine! Really appreciate your kind words… keep in touch with me!!

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    • I’ll tag along, Betty. Your photographs hit me smack in the face. I used to call the likes of them “National Geographic” photographs for lack of a better description. Your photographs tell the story in a credible, human way that words could never capture. Carry on!

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  2. Congratulations dear George, I enjoyed as always to read you and to watch your photographs. Thank you, with my love, nia

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  3. you truly are a versatile blogger!
    thanks for sharing all these interesting things about yourself!
    i do have a question…how many 70 birthdays have you had?

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    • Ha Ha. You are clever. I wish I knew. That last one was a real bitch. Seven children? I’m not going back there! 😉

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  4. I’m a bit overwhelmed by your kind words, George. Thank you from the bottom of my heart. You are so kind. This time I might even try to obey (at least some of) the rules. Who knows?

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    • Come on, Lady D. You could write a poem. You are a poet too, you know. Your kind translation (explanation as you called it) of your poem, Esquisse de deux amis”, in French was really touching. A great description of a man and his dog. Your work is fascinating and reads like a story.

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  5. Yay for you Mollusk-Friend! An extremely apt award for someone with your colorful catalogue of posts! Those eyes; so alive!

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    • Thank you, Mollusk Girl. I think those eyes indicate a very nosy personality! :-0

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  6. George, you know that love and respect here is mutually! What a creative and indeed “versatile” acceptance post for the award. The more people know you are out here the more of these accolades you will receive. You are one creative woman with such an honest and clear view of the world and your own thoughts. I so look forward to my return to Texas sometime this year and hopefully setting eyes and foot inside this amazing world of yours. The septic tanks, the photos, the quips, the humor are all worth the time and effort my friend.
    Cheers to you GW!

    A huge hug,
    Michael

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    • Michael, I treasure every single comment here as if it were an Oscar of its own. I appreciate the nominations, but I am awful about responding to them. I get caught up in my acceptance tale and end up having the nominees sound like an afterthought. I appreciate the acceptance I have found here more than any of you realize. A toast to you and to every single person who ever set foot here!!

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  7. I love your resume, George…and your childhood portrait…and your keeping your eyes open during the morning prayer. Congrats on your award…so deserving….

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    • If there is anybody who has not seen your post, “City paint 3”, he’s missed a real treat. What a fantastic mural, and the story behind it. This is the best graffiti art and social commentary I’ve seen in a very long time, if ever. You captured the essence with your detail photographs too. I loved it.

      Thanks for enjoying the post. I think I almost overlooked the nominations. I hope everybody will check out these people. They all post some really good stuff.

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      • Well thank you, George, for your very nice words about my recent post. I loved standing there on the street looking at it in full life-size…almost overwhelmed my the literal and figurative presence. I’m very glad you liked it so much.

        And yes, I did enjoy your post of thanking Michael. I will be checking it again…and then going visiting…hoping to make some new friends. 🙂

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  8. Congrats on your well deserved award. No doubt your firm understanding of traditional English Grammar was invaluable in making well constructed concrete septic tanks. Not a misplaced modifier in a single one. Bet they had excellent metaphors too ! 😀
    Your weight loss experience may be the basis for a whole new health kick. You could write a book, get on Ellen to chat, and even have an online presence. …..Oh, right, never mind.

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    • Let us get one fact straight, here. I did not study English grammar. I majored in English Literature…most of which I can no longer keep straight. I was bad at math too. I know nothing of physics or of chemistry or engineering design. I think my job description would have been more appropriately labeled “laborer”. I was a good laborer.

      Never again. I refuse to construct a metaphor after having read your perfect one. I have searched for that post again, but with no success. Let me know where it is.

      I took one dumb summer school course designed for future moronic teachers called “Phonics” or something. I recall having to hear the difference in nuanced sounds in words. That, I did easily. Today, I have to look up “phonology” or “phonetics” to be sure I know what the words mean. Any aptitude I might have for language is genetic, not learned, I assure you. When I taught English, we kept the grammar books in a shelf along the wall. I was firm in my assertion that we used them as reference books. Now, I thought that was clever. Heck, we wrote and read and had fun. Some of those plowboys could write and I mean write. They couldn’t spell, but they could write if you paid a little attention and cajoled it out of them. I took one advanced grammar course that was required to establish proficiency in my department. I never really understood it, but I managed to pass. 😉

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      • I always felt that good grammarians became proof-readers ( biological spell check). Quality writing is not based on mastering a set of rules. What is still true today is that when you put a grammar section on a test or exam, students can get all the answers or most of them correct, but still make the same errors when writing their essays and short answers. Somehow it is a non-transferable payment; different sections of the brain doing different jobs.
        As to the rules themselves, Anglo-Saxon Literature and Introductory Linguistics cured me of any lingering belief I had that grammar and spelling rules are carved in stone ( more like half-set jello).. Here is the link to my metaphor-pun madness.
        http://darkpinesphoto.wordpress.com/2011/06/12/news-from-the-front-lines/

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        • I agree one-hundred percent. I never believed that the teaching of grammar much improved a student’s spoken or written grammar. Children learn language by hearing it spoken, I think.

          Thanks for the link. It remains the best example of an extended metaphor that I ever read in my life.

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  9. That’s an adorable picture of you from around first grade!! Those bright, sparkly eyes are really great.

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    • That is my first grade picture. The only other early ones are separate sittings of you and Tommy and me at some studio when I was about five, I think. Do you have yours? I think I only have mine. You were such an aristocratic-looking, beautiful, curly-haired child. I was the scraggly, Gravel Gertie-haired one! I was grinning from ear to ear in the photo though.

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    • Thanks, Colline. My life has been interesting and fun although I complained long and loudly every step of the way! 🙂

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    • I know precisely where Jimmy Hoffa is. He is in every cement mixer in the world. If you haven’t read “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks”, read it now. You will be fascinated. And, you’ll have your answer re: the fate of Jimmy Hoffa.

      Glad you liked the resume. I left out only the good parts….

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  10. George
    New image of you – nice look. Congratulations on a well deserved award. You have certainly had a colorful past in the jobs you did. As for telling us your age, you are timeless. All the best.

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    • Yes, I have done lots of things in my life. I don’t think I could have stayed in one job forever. I don’t like it when “they shut the door”. I like being able to come and go with some measure of freedom. I could live in prison happily if they’d leave the door open. Age? I never felt any age. Now, I feel half-dead on some days, but I never associate it with age. I am lazy. I think the condition is called “de-conditioning”, the etiology of which is sitting on one’s butt. I am as amazed by the number, seventy, as anybody else is. I wonder if all seventy-year-olds think the same?

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  11. George in the first grade: that’s my favorite photo. I can see the mischief in those eyes. I also enjoyed the link to Martha of Two Connecticut Lives. I knew that your business was in concrete, but not septic tanks: very interesting! I like the photograph of the tank, too. Congratulations on the award! By the way, Che looks like he want to come out of that cage. 🙂 (What a precious face!)

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    • Che is a sweet little thing. He comes to the cage bars for kisses. He likes faces. He fears hands. That’s characteristic of chinchillas. They are bright-eyed, intelligent little creatures. He searches all over my face, but he never bites. That is strange because he pulls the skin on my hands hard sometimes. I suppose he’s too interested in communicating with the face to bite. The first time he did that, I thought I’d probably come away with half a nose. Half a nose might not be a bad thing in my case…now that I think about it! I liked Martha too. There are so many fascinating little glimpses of people’s lives out there. I am looking forward to hearing more about your friend in the garden. I am sure she love having you visiting her.

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  12. I found it very interesting, reading this background information about you. Especially, that you were a teacher once. I had some wonderful teachers in my life. And I still feel grateful about that

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    • I think I have been a bit of a lot of things, Shimon. And, the hysterical part is that I thought I was good at all of them. Hell, I still do! 😉

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    • Thank you, Pablo. I don’t do anything well so I wander around dabbling into a bit of everything. I have the attention span of a two-year-old. 🙂

      Like

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