Fan Palm Fun

Light Drenched Palm

Fan Palm

I don’t normally peek outside until waaaay after the middle of the day; however, the other day, some really inconsiderate person rang my phone.  That doesn’t usually make me sufficiently alert to stagger up out of my bed.  I did that day for some reason.  Since Romero was trimming shrubs in my garden, I walked out with my camera.  Wow, how bright the sunlight is these days.  I thought cataracts were supposed to provide some benefit of shade like sunglasses.  I guess not.  Anyway, I snapped some photos of my favorite trees in the world, fan palms.   When I looked at them, I realized they were completely over-exposed.  Light was shining through the leaves!

Light Shadow Fan Palm

Light Shadow Fan Palm

I do not recall ever having seen a light pattern like this in any photograph that I ever snapped.  At first, I was a little confused.  I was thinking “shadow”.  I finally realized that I was not looking at a shadow.  I was looking at a light pattern shining through open areas in the surrounding palm fronds.  They almost looked like human figures to me.  So I grunged them up.  I kind of like them.

Palm Frond Against A Wall

Palm Frond Against A Wall

 

 

Post Apocalypse World

Post Apocalypse

 

 

Light Drenched Palm

Light Drenched Palm

 

I am dedicating this post to all of the people who suffer from tremors.  Some tremors are familial; some tremors are secondary to diseases like Parkinson’s Disease.  Whatever the etiology of the tremor, its effect is the same.  Even with a VR lens, it is impossible for us to produce a sharp image.  Instead of lamenting our loss, we should celebrate the ability to walk outside, snap a photograph of a fan palm, and alter it to produce an image that we can enjoy.   Beauty really has no standard.  It comes from the heart and soul.

I extend my gratitude to all of you who view my photographs with such a kind and gentle eye.  Thank you!   May all of you have a happy holiday with family and friends.

33 Comments on “Fan Palm Fun

  1. This is such a beautiful collection of studies on the palm fan… and certainly a pleasure to look at again and again. What is important, in my eyes, is the finished image of the photographer… and just how he got the effect, or why is of far less importance to me. But since you did choose to tell us about some of your considerations on the way… I would suggest to you, as I would to anyone who has tremors, that he get a tripod right away, and start experimenting with that wonderful tool. For many years, I used to work with very heavy large format cameras, that one couldn’t really take ‘snapshots’ with. They had to be set up with a tripod. But even so, we got some fine pictures. The whole issue of the tremor will disappear, and you will discover added possibilities.

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    • Thank you, Shimon! Your opinion is important to me. I long to take the kinds of photographs that you do. I may never be able to come close, but a tripod and a little knowledge of how the camera works wouldn’t hurt, would it? I appreciate the advice. I am lazy too, you know. Ah, George….

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  2. Excellent compositions! The quality of light and colour combine with the patterns in a striking manner.
    At first I thought you wrote that Romeo was trimming shrubs in the garden. Ah light through yonder palm does shine,……… 😀

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    • Well, when we bought this house, it had a back YARD…not a garden. The back yard was full of ticks. Yeah, ticks. We walked through and bought the house without paying much attention. It was next door to our daughter. We leased it back to the people for over a year before they moved out and we moved in. Then came the tick problem. My daughter, Kelli, ripped out every piece of living thing in the yard and began to treat for ticks. They can live up to seven or so years in the soil. Then Dean found out he was going to die. Immediately, he had a screened porch built onto the house with a TV mounted on the drop down ceiling on the house wall side. The thing was built within six weeks. Kelli designed a garden and had it installed complete with huge queen palms, pygmy date palmy, shrubs, vines, flowering plants, etc., along with a curved stone walkway to her house. Overnight, it looked as if it had been there for years. It was magical. Her final gift to her father. No, his name is not Romeo, but I’ll tell him. He’ll grin about that.

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  3. These are very artistic, George. In some, I feel that I am being drawn down a tunnel. One looks like feathers, which underlines how everything is connected. Other are like paintings. All of these are very beautiful.

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    • Thank you. I liked the shapes, but the photos were over-exposed. I didn’t want to delete them so I played with them in PicMonkey. Actually, I probably should have added shadows and left them alone. I never know when to leave well enough alone when I start something! 🙂

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  4. George, these are masterful photographs. The patterns, the colors, the composition! Each one in this series is more intriguing than the last. The last one caught me by surprise and nearly took my breath away. I was in a gallery yesterday and there was nothing that could beat this art show!

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  5. Creative shots… I loved them, especially the green tones fascinated me in these compositisions. Thank you dear George, with my love, nia

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  6. Creative images! Yes, we should all be grateful for the simple things we take for granted like walking in the sunshine. I hope you get to sleep undisturbed tomorrow!

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    • Yep, we are inclined to forget what we have left. My father never complained as he lost first one function and another. He made do with what he had left until the very end. I should be more like he was. I am a talented complainer….I try to give it my best shot on a daily basis…

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  7. George, these images are delightful. The various patterns and lines and shades of green are fascinating. I particularly like “Light Drenched Palm” because it creates for me–who struggles with spatial depth perception–the ability to perceive a powerful depth in the image. I also really like Warhol Palm Leaf I (for the same reason, and also because of the textures and the richness of the greens). I think it’s important not only to enjoy the images we create, but also the process that goes into making them, and I have the impression that you did just that. Your tremor is integral to your photography now, and is something you work with (rather than against), and the results are images that are special not only for you but for all of us. You never know how what you might struggle with as a photographer, how what you have to negotiate to produce your idea, will end up affecting or reaching someone who is looking at what you’ve made. ~Lemony

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    • Ah, Lemony. You see something of value wherever you look. I think of the skinny old cat. You made her look so long and elegant. I know, looking at her, that she is an old, long-legged cat of no special breeding, but she looks so elegant in your interpretation of her. Your ability to see beauty is a thing of beauty itself. Thank you.

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    • Okay, Lori, you convinced me. As much as I’ll miss it, you can have my tremor. 😉 I know what you mean. I agree. I have known a good many people (I was a social worker for years.) who had afflictions of one kind or another. It’s how they dealt with it that made it an affliction or just some quirk they had to work around. I’m glad you like these. I would have liked them even if the photographs had been perfect. I get bored easily and overdo the next project. And, of course, I am shameless enough to post anything. I like these, however.

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  8. Yesterday I spent a good hour or more trying to repot a pair of Majesty Palms we keep in the living room. By the time I was through, my knees were killing me and I swore I never wanted to see palms again in my life.

    Until I saw THESE!!!
    They are GORGEOUS!!!
    I love your treatment of them. It is nothing less than superb.

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    • Thank you, Lance. Knee pads, my man, knee pads. If you drop something on that slate floor and have to crawl under your desk to get it, you bruise your knees. I get Charlie to crawl under mine! kids have fat knees or a high pain threshold. I dunno’. We need knee pads.

      I’m glad you like my little dabble into special effects. I follow rubicorno. Do you? He uses all of those Snapseed/Grunge apps for his photographs. Of course, he is shooting wonderful old Italian architecture including those beautiful cemetery monuments. He does a really fine job with that genre.

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    • That’s precisely what I like about fan palms. Their fronds catch the light in such interesting patterns.

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    • Thanks, Scott. If I were your age, I’d kick your butt in the photograph department. Now, I’ll settle for just soaking up yours! Ah, what a joy that is too!

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  9. Art comes from the mean and inclinations we have as people. Your particular tremors lend themselves to a singular touch with the camera that is inimitable. I notice nothing here (and I am being as critical as I am capable) that suggests flaws in the physical components of your photos. You are painting with light, choice, and selective input of electronic filters. This is a level of work that many, including me, find engaging and thought provoking. I would hang any of these on my wall.

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    • Thank you, Michael. You are kind. I like them, but I am strange, you know! 🙂 I would very much like to be able to capture a sharp photograph, but I am afraid I’ve waited too long. I enjoy it anyway. I appreciate your encouragement.

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      • Well, if you really must nail that sharpness my guess is you know how to do it. Tripod and shutter release. I use mine so often it is like a pet. I cannot imagine shooting many of the things I want without the aid of this steadying device. I saw a guy on the hiking trail the other day running up the hill and suddenly stop, pull out his Sony and leica Macro with a mini tripod and shoot a tiny flower on the trail. I was so inspired I ordered a new Gorilla tripod that night. I will be playing it with it this weekend. In essence your camera could live in this thing and the electronic shutter release is no larger than a car key. I think you would have fun with these

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        • Are you pushing me, Michael? I think so. JC has given me a tripod that I can hold on my shoe even. I have a tiny one somewhere for macro shots. I guess I’ll have to get up off my lazy butt and try. You and Lemony! She’s tried to get me to throw out my flash. Now, I notice how harsh it is. Thanks for taking the time and caring enough to try to help me. You are a sweetheart, Michael. I am waiting to see what you do with the Gorilla this weekend! 😉

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          • I am going to get my first off camera flash and strobes this month. I have no idea how to shoot flash stuff. We will see what the gorilla does for Easter shots. I am very reluctant to push George. Recently I stayed a little long where they were having a fire and I nearly got all my hair burnt off. I have a huge heart and a BIG mouth and often that causes confusion. I am hopeful that my gently nudges to you will only be perceived as they are…in support and love 🙂

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            • If I didn’t know that, I’d lock you out of the house. I really do appreciate the advice. I’m inclined to be a real slacker if I can get by with it. I am still laughing about the hair burning off! There ain’t a damn thing wrong with a big heart or a big mouth. 🙂

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