Nice Bad Photographs

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60 Comments on “Nice Bad Photographs

  1. Pingback: Q-tip Noir « Dark Pines Photo

  2. Why bad, I can’t see any reason… πŸ™‚ you are amazing dear George, these are all wonderful photographs especially the compositions are so nice… they all talk… Thank you, I love your way of looking with your amazing camera… With my love, nia

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  3. I agree with Shimon – the end result is the thing. It doesn’t matter how you got there. If everyone always followed ‘the rules’ there would be no experimentation, few surprises, few advances. Man Ray accidentally discovered the solarisation effect in a darkroom.
    Having said all that, I do admit that my technical skills are somewhat lacking. But then I only have my camera phone . . . πŸ™‚

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    • I’m in the position of knowing that I don’t know. It’s kind of like the way people feel who do not have the same background qualifications on a job. They think their opinion has no credibility because they lack the skills to afford them an opinion. I have definite opinions about virtually everything. (You wouldn’t know that, would you?) Normally, I would not be bothered by my lack of skill or knowledge. In this area, we are surrounded by people who have great skill and artistic ability. I am almost too intimidated to post a photograph. I react kind of like sticking a toe in and running for dear life when I post a photo.
      πŸ˜‰ People here are really kind though. Nobody says our photos are awful. Perhaps they don’t expect much from those of us who are not photographers, and that’s the way it should be. We are just trying to illustrate what we’re thinking today. And, it’s really good to have such a forgiving place to do that.

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      • No real artist is condescending about other people’s work. Professionals get on with the job and like to see what other people are doing, whether they be other professionals or amateurs. An amateur can come up with something that a professional would never have done. Real artists are learning all the time. They have a spiritual dimension which is lacking in those who are only interested in making money.

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    • I don’t read a lot of your work, Michael, I am sorry to say. I just run out of time. I know you are a very good writer with imagination and a sense of humanity. I have read enough of your work to know that.

      My question is what are you attempting to do? You may be too much all over the place. You are interested in so many disparate things that your blog may come off as a bit scattered. I think it’s lively and equally funny and touching. I suspect it would be difficult to categorize your blog. That may be good or bad. I don’t know. Look at it and see if I’m getting it.

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      • No, you are correct. This is why I am trying to create much more of conduit of traffic as simply stories based on travel. It is indeed both fact and fiction which is not everyone’s cup of tea for sure. David Sedaris is one of my favorite writers and his stories are episodic in nature and chapters of his books bounce through the gamut of subjects. In essence he tells stories. Anthony Bourdain a successful food writer and television personality does much the same. While his work is framed with food and travel it is the stories that happen within this context that are intriguing.
        My focus and I think if you skim the top 80% of my 165+ posts is to tell stories in a range of topics from humor to wine and all with a bent towards humorous existential observation.
        Yes, we all run out of time in our efforts to be supportive. I know this and I will take your advice and sharpen the points a bit.
        Cheers,
        M

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        • I can’t believe I have posted something like 135 myself. How do we do that? You and I must be real chatterboxes! Don’t listen to me. I don’t pay attention. I think your blog is #1 pretty and appealing on sight. Then, it’s easy to read with the font and background. It’s sophisticated. There are great stories and good information. What else should a blog be? I think you are impatient. Nah…not Michael.

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      • George, when I think about it, your blog has a pretty wide range itself from photography to personal stories and people at McDonald’s drive thrus πŸ™‚ I think we always know where we will find you and when. There is likely something in your consistency of “place” that perhaps I should consider further.

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        • I was thinking the very same thing as I wrote that. I am pretty hammered in place here, I guess. I am old too. Remember that it’s much easier in the presence of old, tolerant women than it is in your presence. You are young and clever and full of information much like your peers who visit your blog. I just shuffle along grinning like the proverbial monkey and sticking my nose into every corner. I am harmless. And, it’s obvious. You young people are not benign in the same way. And you should not be. I think, from what I read, that all young professional people here are competitive, independent people who are as concerned about traffic as you are.

          Tell me what a large number of followers means to all of you? In the real world, what is it good for? That’s how I decide what is important in business. If I can answer that question, I know if a thing is something my business should pursue. Is it worth it in dollars and cents? If it isn’t, then it can be simple fun. I don’t believe anybody can mix up the two successfully, do you? Now that I think about it, I believe people get a sense of what we are about.

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          • for me it is simple. when I reach a certain number of followers it virtually guarantees me an audience with a publisher I would like versus one that I would need. I have little interest in diving into a pool with perfect form so as not to disturb the water. I want to do a running can-opener from 25 feet πŸ™‚ You are right, we are competitive. I have a window of time my amazing wife is granting me before family is our priority and before she shoots herself at a job she hates. I have a fiduciary requirement to either shit or get off the pot as the saying goes. This means I have little time for patience or protracted periods of slow growth. I also have a former business partner whom I want very much to outstrip in terms of personal success and I generously built him a 3+ year head start. Of course all of this sounds maniacal in written form and it is hard to explain that without the competition I would simply cook, drink, and play video games. I am akin to a herding dog. I need a job and I need to keep it all in line. If I do not create any fires there would be none to extinguish. This is why I get out of bed in the morning George. I believe that I have something that will benefit the planet and it will not succeed unless I will it πŸ™‚

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            • I think that kind of drive is what it takes. Those who have it will make it and those who don’t will cook and drink and play video games. You’ll get there. I see why it’s important now. I should have thought of the publisher thing.

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              • You think about plenty on my behalf George and I thank you. You are an educated sounding board and an honest critic. This is something so many writers would sell their first born to have. I am grateful if a bit of a petulant character. πŸ™‚

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                • Ha Ha. The rebel son some of us could appreciate. You gotta’ be a Kook Mama to love a son like you, Michael. You’d make most mamas too nervous. I bet yo mama adores you. πŸ™‚

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  4. Very nice photographs… don’t understand exactly where the ‘bad’ comes in. Though I understand that in the modern jargon, bad is often used as an ironic reference to the opposite… so that bad means good?

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    • Thank you, Shimon. If you think they are nice, they are nice. What I mean is that the photographs are not technically good photographs. I took really grainy or dark photographs and manipulated them into this.
      In my opinion, a really good photograph is one that I can take directly off the camera card, resize it, and post it. Your photographs are that kind of photographs. I am thinking of the last photographs you posted of the friends and grandchildren. Those are classic photographs, as you know.
      It fascinates me to make something that I like from something that is really just a junk photograph that most people would delete. Those are the ones I remember.
      Obviously, I am not a photographer. I don’t listen or read the camera manual. You would be very impatient with a photography student like me! πŸ™‚

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      • Your point of view is familiar to me. I’ve heard such ideas before, but I don’t agree. I believe that in all the arts, what matters is the results. It’s true, I might get impatient with a student who didn’t bother to read the instruction manual of a camera he bought… but there is nothing wrong with using a knife to spread color on an oil painting, or to use some editing program to intensify the tones on a photograph that doesn’t satisfy you. And it is hard for us to discern what is really classic… others will judge that as time goes on. What is important though, is to communicate something in a picture or a story… something that reaches the hearts and the imagination of those who trouble to read or gaze at the work. And refining your work… putting in a little more work, after it leaves the camera, is only to your credit.

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        • You are a logical, rational thinker who evaluates your subject and decides the best method of helping the subject to represent itself. I am inclined to impose my subjective view of the subject onto the photograph. The quality of the end product aside, I think that is the difference in people. I feel no obligation to present an accurate picture of the subject. I think you do. That’s why I am describing your photographs as “classic” photography.

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  5. Also? I want a Maltese Flamingo! I’d name him Mcguffin, and love him and squeeze him and call him george. Or humphrey. Or peter. πŸ˜‰

    KC & Co.

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    • I think we will now all have to Maltese Flamingo posts in honour of George.

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      • Okay, Joseph, I googled Maltese Flamingo. A bunch of ski bums in a new classic movie? At least, I’ll recognize the posts….maybe. Leave me a footnote. πŸ™‚

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    • A wild guess here, KC. Humphrey and Peter must be the ski bums? You guys got me on this one. Joseph always sends me to Google with every post! He’s mischievous that way! πŸ™‚

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      • *laughs* Add Bogart and Lorrie to your search. And old movies. And in my case, Warner Bro. cartoons. *hugs*

        KC

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        • Would you and Joseph stop teasing an old lady! Bogart, I understand. You lost me with the rest. I don’t even have my coffee yet and you guys are poking me in my old ribs! (Laughs…first time today)

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          • *giggles* Ok, ok, since you ask so nicely. πŸ˜‰ Straight from the Wiki’s mouth.

            “The Maltese Falcon is a 1941 Warner Bros. film based on the novel of the same name by Dashiell Hammett. Written for the screen and directed by John Huston, the film stars Humphrey Bogart as private investigator Sam Spade; Mary Astor as his femme fatale client; Gladys George; Peter Lorre; and Sydney Greenstreet in his film debut. The film was Huston’s directorial debut and was nominated for three Academy Awards.
            The story concerns a San Francisco private detective’s dealings with three unscrupulous adventurers who compete to obtain a fabulous jewel-encrusted statuette of a falcon.”

            “The Maltese Falcon (statue) is considered a classic example of a MacGuffin, a plot device that motivates the characters of the story but otherwise has little relevance.”

            And I was also riffing on of my favorite bugs-bunny episodes, in which a giant snow-critter/yeti/abominable snow monster wants to keep Bugs as a pet, but winds up being convinced (by Bugs, of course) to take Daffy instead. “And I will love him and hug him and squuueeeze him and stroke him, and I will call him George…” *hugs* Feel better now? Now go have some coffee for me…I’m not allowed. *pouts*

            KC

            Also, I spelled Lorre wrong. My bad.

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            • The bunny pet and name George drive from the classic movie & novel “O Mice and Men”. In the cartoon the Yeti voice and lines are imitating Lon Chaney Jr., when played the character Lennie, Burgess Meredith played the character George.
              Your photographs have a 40-50’s vibe of ” film noir movies”, as in “The Maltese Falcon”. So the bird statuette suggested to my twisted global thinking, Maltese Flamingo. The Shakespeare reference, ” the stuff of dreams” comes from the movie.
              The ski bum movie, which I was not aware of, only redeeming feature is the title, which they then waste.

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              • Oh lord, yes. Poor Lennie. I see the film noir mood in these too. I understood the stuff of dreams. I knew the Maltese Flamingo was a reference to the Falcon. You guys are too quick for me. Thanks! As I said, maybe a footnote or two? πŸ˜‰

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  6. Cool shots George!!
    The first one is my favorite, love the light and all the shapes that you captured there; and the shadow in the last one is so amazing!

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    • Thanks, Pablo. The funny thing is that I couldn’t see the bricks outside until I hit “Auto fix”, or whatever it is, in PSP. πŸ™‚ I stumble around in PaintShop Pro clicking stuff until I get something I like. There is no method here. πŸ™‚ There is some measure of fun in not knowing what you’re doing, after all.

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      • Hahaha, sometimes it’s the same with me, when I edit the pictures… There are times that I don’t really know what to do and I start clickng anywhere until I get something that looks good to me πŸ™‚

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        • Wahoo! I am laughing to hear you say that. I bet you’re the only young professional photographer in the world who would admit that. And, that’s precisely why we adore you! πŸ™‚

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          • Hahaha, I’m not professional πŸ™‚
            ANd it’s funny, sometimes I know wxactly what to do on photoshop to get what I want, but some other times I think there is nothing I can do to make a picture look better, so I start trying everything πŸ™‚

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  7. Hi George, these are lovely photos. They remind me a little bit of the black and white photos my dad used to take–he was very professional. My sister is an artist, and she paints like you photograph. She might sit down with a group of painters, and while everyone else is painting the Mendenhall Glacier, she is focusing on the lovely berry bush at her feet. You have that kind of eye, where you help us see the ordinary world in a different way. Wonderful post!

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    • How nice you are, Gail. I like where I live, wherever it happens to be. I am interested in whatever is around me, that’s true. I never run out of stuff to photograph. It makes me happy that you like what I see. I know it isn’t like it’s supposed to be, but I like it. I do love good photography that other people do. I love the great street photographers especially. I’d like to see some of your sister’s paintings. Is the whole family full of artists?

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  8. They have a fascinating atmosphere, of an untold tale or providing clues to a mystery. The style remind me of the 1940-50’s, especially the last one of The Maltese Flamingo. πŸ™‚

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    • Am I stuck in some romantic time machine thing? Surely not. I always like nuance and mystery and dark humor. The wonder is they never put me away….yet.

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        • It is the stuff dreams are made of,…… and that is how you stuff a Maltese Flamingo. πŸ˜€

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  9. I like them, George. They aren’t ‘bad’, they are rather lovely. Some of the most boring, lifeless images I have seen were technically very good . . .

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    • Okay, you’re officially my hero. I have no idea why I always like the bad ones. And, I KNOW they’re bad. πŸ™‚ Syncopation fascinates me too.

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      • That’s always the way. You Ladies are attracted to the bad ones no matter what anyone says.. And after all is said and done all that you will have to show for it is a Maltese Flamingo. πŸ™‚

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    • Thanks, Lance. There was very low light in the house and I didn’t compensate. That’s how it went. Hey, I got some fairly good photos doing what Lemony told me. I have to post them tomorrow. I can’t use the frame I ordered for Rita. I am not going to trim that painting. I think it is going to have to be a custom frame. I so love that watercolor! I smile every time I look at her! πŸ™‚

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    • Thanks, Ana. I like the weird, out of focus, grainy ones. Good thing too since that’s what I get most of the time! πŸ™‚

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    • Thanks, Mike. I like them although they are technically bad. I did get a damn door! My own. Ha Ha. You have me looking at doors all over town. If I wreck, I’m giving your number to bail me. πŸ™‚

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      • I will bail you George on the condition that you hang out with me for a length of time. Either that or you do a stretch of time.

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          • Ooh, ooh…you can take her to go see the ghost-lady! Y’all can take her picture, and George can talk to her and get her life story and write about it!

            Love you guys!

            KC & Co.

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