What Color Is A Dead Chameleon?

Mr. C

I snapped Mr. C one night when it was so dark that I had to guess where he was.  He’d been sitting in precisely the same place without moving for two days.  I assumed he was dead.  I forgot about the photo.  Today, when I was clearing out some old photos, I found him and lightened the photo out of curiosity.  That’s when I discovered his open eye.  I began to wonder.  He had disappeared after two days, after all.  Wouldn’t he have been brown if he were dead?   I tried to delete him.  This is silly, I told myself.  Who cares?  I couldn’t hit delete.  I was becoming increasing annoyed.  I went on to some nice palm tree photographs.

Finally, since I couldn’t shake him out of my head, I went back to him.  I told him that he was a bad photograph and had to go.  It is not personal, I said.  I mean no disrespect for the ugly dead.  I swear I heard him say, Yeah?  Well, I’m the only Chameleon you’ll ever persuade to be still enough to photograph!   Jerk!  I said.

In a desperate effort to put the question to rest, I Googled What color is a dead chameleon?  Would you believe the Naked Scientist scribbled in that precisely-worded question last Christmas?  I couldn’t believe it either.  I tried to ignore the fact that this whole thing was getting a bit creepy.  Mr. C  just sat there looking at me through that slit of an eye, grinning his antediluvian grin.

 Such are the preoccupations of old women who don’t have to be anywhere.

NOTE:  Steve over at Portraits of Wildflowers was kind enough to debunk my whole story!  This little guy is an green anole lizard.  Check out anoles here.  And Chameleons here.  Thank you for the links, Steve.     (He’s still my little Chameleon!)

40 Comments on “What Color Is A Dead Chameleon?

  1. A number of lizards change colour to blend into their surroundings. Lounge lizards do it frequently. Anole this to be true. I read it on the internet. 😀

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  2. I was a bit saddened by the discussion on the naked scientists site about the color of the dead chameleon, but I I love Mr. C! Look at his sweet “hand.” I recall my mother mentioning a fad when she as young (growing up in Arkansas). She said that when she was a teenager (in the mid-50s), she and her friends would attach chameleons to their clothes (somehow pinning a string to their tails so that they could crawl around on their shirts, blending in with the different patterns, etc. Such an astonishingly cruel trend!

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    • Like pinching off the tails of lightening bugs and sticking them all over us! Kids today would not do that.

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  3. You just put a big smile on my face!
    I loved this post, it was nice to read, I laughed and enjoyed!
    Since I read the title I knew I was gonna like it 🙂

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    • I’m glad you liked it, Pablo. I honestly thought the thing was dead until I saw the photo recently. I’d like to know why he stayed motionless for two days. He was pale-looking as if he were dead. Strange.

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  4. Damn! I just wrote a comment and then pressed the ‘like’ button and voila! No comment and no beady eye!

    So, I’ll write it again:

    Oh, but he’s lovely! And you make me laugh, George! Thank you!

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  5. I always found reptile smiles to be enchanting. They seem to have that “I know something you don’t know” air about them. In this case Mr. C knows something you don’t know–dead or alive, he knows (knew) it. 🙂 And such are the ponderings of another woman who has nowhere else to be…

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    • They have that all-knowing eye too. I swear it’s a kind of undeniable sentience. This guy is NOT a chameleon. He’s a green anole lizard! OOPS! 🙂

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    • My chameleon isn’t a chameleon, after all. He’s an anole lizard! Good grief! He was not only not dead, he wasn’t even a chameleon. (Can you say “not only not:?) Ha Ha. We live and learn. 🙂

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  6. Nice shot. I see the old buzzard played hide and seek with you. You are ever so lucky to have such preoccupations. What’s the need to being anywhere else when you can enjoy yourself snapping pictures and sharing them with us. 🙂

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    • Ah, Totsy. You are such a jewel. Are you back from your wanderings? I have to check in. Yes, I always went around framing things in my head according to my ridiculous take on them. People do some funny stuff. Animals too. I’ve been in all the “anywhere else” places I ever want to be. I’m a hermit. But even hermits look out the window once in awhile. I enjoy all of you more than you can imagine. Thanks! 🙂

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  7. Great fun post, George! If I may say so, this looks like a lizard though. Being that we’re from different continents and hemispheres though, is it called a chameleon there? Our chameleons are altogether different, much more prehistoric! Either way, great fun!

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    • He’s a chameleon. I think some of them grow to several feet long, but we only have the little ones here. They are cute and harmless and eat mosquitoes and flies so we like them.

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      • So interesting how completely different they are to ours! Thanks George! Please have a look at some of ours – you’ll be fascinated!

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        • He’s NOT a chameleon. I just found out he’s an anole lizard. You were right in the first place. Thanks! I don’t know if we even have chameleons in the wild here. Have to check!

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  8. Yup. I did it. I googled “what color is a dead chameleon,” and there it was, the Naked Scientist. Funny! I live for these moments, you know….

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    • I had such phenomenal luck with the dead chameleon, I asked Google, “What color is a dead person?” That Missy Google knows everything. Did you know how long to keep dye on a dead person’s hair? Missy Google knows.

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  9. lol George what a lovely fun post….And I thought you were kidding about the Naked scientist part so after reading this i googled it too..oh my the naked scientist does exist and somehow this fact made every other thing so small and irrelevant 😆
    but thanks to you now I know the colour of dead chameleon and the site add. of naked scientist 😉

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        • I swear I replied to your comments on the chameleon twice! I don’t see them. I laughed when you described the Naked Scientist discovery. My reaction was exactly like yours. I thought for a second that I was seeing things! 🙂

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