Dancing Palm Fronds

I went out looking for light bubbles ON PURPOSE this afternoon.  I knew precisely where to find them.  They always dance in the palms when the setting sun plays with them late in the afternoon.  If you listen carefully, you can hear them singing.  I also found the large family of mosquitoes who live under the palms.  UGH.  These leaves were swaying gracefully in the breeze the way they always do.  They look like long-legged dancers to me.  I love palm trees.  I am fascinated with everything about them.  I grew up  in the Piedmont area of North Carolina, USA, where there are no palms.  I think that’s why they interest me now.  I have a Queen Palm, Pygmy Date Palms and these Fan Palms.  The background on my blog is a photograph of one of my Fan Palm leaves.

We wrap the Pygmy Date Palm trunks in Christmas lights, burlap and tarps.  We double-bag the tops with nursery bags too.  We have to do this in order to keep them warm when it freezes here.   I had to replace the Pygmies one year.  That is a big deal for Romero.  I think the kids and I are the only people in our little neighborhood who keep palms.  They are a lot of trouble in the winter.  I have to worry about them.

No, the top photograph is not the bottom one with the legs cut off.   🙂

33 Comments on “Dancing Palm Fronds

  1. Beautiful compositions. Giving your palms a high-five. 🙂
    Our mosquito season has yet to start – as of yesterday the “little black fly of Ontar-I-Oh”is back. Start crating just thinking about the little devils.

    Like

  2. Wow, I always look to Pablo as the master of bokeh. Now I have TWO experts to inspire me. The bokeh in these images is really, REALLY good! I am so impressed, George. You have done a great honor to your beautiful dancers.

    Like

    • You know I can’t leave well enough alone. I am the quintessential drama queen. I start playing and don’t know when to stop. Joseph says I’m stuck in the sixties. Thank you, Lemony Girl. Now I know how to find my bubbles! Whoopeee… 🙂

      Like

    • And you see things in delightful ways that I don’t. Thank you.

      Like

        • I know. I am amazed when I read the rare blog like yours. What you say tickles me because you think with such informed cleverness. Where is the book? I got lost.

          Like

  3. Love these! I love how graceful palms are and you’re right! They do look like dancers 🙂
    Thanks for sharing this!

    Like

    • Ha Ha. I’m the bubble expert now that I know how to do it. 🙂 I’m glad you like them. I’m a fan of the dramatic, I’m afraid! Thanks, Pablo.

      Like

  4. Beautiful bubbles! I’ve only been able to catch the bubbles accidently….like you said earlier, it’s a lovely surprise. I’m going to go hunting for them one of these days.

    I like how you added the palms to page background.

    elisa

    Like

    • Elisa, You have to be shooting something that is suspended in front of a filtered light area. These fronds were hanging in the same light I was standing in and over against a background of filtered light, not dark, but filtered. There is a fence about 6-8 ft. behind with palms, etc., in it, but there is a space of lower light behind the leaves. I used a Nikkor 20-200mm telephoto lens that gives me lots of DOF. I was standing in full light shooting the fronds in the same light where I was, but there was lower light behind the fronds. It was late afternoon when the sun was at a lower angle into the area, but it was still bright light. I always get bubbles in the bokeh in that situation. I was shooting across the light. I get it in filtered light under the pergola too. I will post my cactus garden photos. The light causes bubbles there too since it is filtered through a lattice wall. Happy Bubble Hunt!! 🙂

      Like

      • That actually made good sense to me. You’ve given me the confidence to “shoot across the light.” Very beautiful words, really. Photography is such a wonder, isn’t it.

        Thanks for your help!

        elisa

        Like

    • No, they are no work at all. You throw palm food on them once or twice a year. Plant them very shallow. Their only enemy is cold weather. The Fan Palms are much hardier than the Pygmies. The Queen Palm grown very tall. Mine is probably twenty-five feet tall already. Buy large plants that are nearly the size you want them to be. I love the Fans because their fronds are fascinating. You wouldn’t believe how they grow and catch the light.

      Like

    • Hi, Rosy! Thanks. I like it when people tell me what they’re doing! You do that too. We’re having a conversation here in Cloud Land, aren’t we? I hope so anyway. 🙂

      Like

    • Thanks, Boomie. They are just simple fan palm leaf ends. The ends of the large fronds fold over and dance in the breeze. I love palms! 😉 They play with light in the most fascinating way.

      Like

  5. I loved them, you are amazing and the title almost hit the subject… Great shots. Thank you dear George, with my love, nia

    Like

    • Thanks, Mona. I just saw your photos on Flickr. They are wonderful…every one! I enjoyed them. You have a distinctive style. I like it. Thanks for visiting my palm dancers! 🙂

      Like

    • Oh, do I love bubbles in the bokeh! 🙂 I like my palm frond background because it’s my photograph. Thank you for noticing that it was mine. I can’t seem to take photographs like everybody else. I always end up with some strange view of whatever it is that I see. Just as well since I am out of focus myself! 🙂

      Like

Comments

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: