A Holiday Walk

Today is a holiday in the United States.  It is a time of gathering together with family and friends to reflect on our lives.

Today, I was in the company of my dogs and my chinchilla, Che, and my parrot companion, Rita

The sun was shining and it was warm in the garden.

Since I wrote the first three lines, the weeks have come and gone and it’s almost Christmas.

As I walked, I found interesting things … secrets hidden in plain sight.  The light was alternately a soft hazy light flowing into a mysterious darkness as I found my way into the recesses of the garden.

As anyone who knows me understands, the fan palms fascinate me.  They are magical.  They play with light in a way that no other plant does.  When I photographed this leaf some weeks ago, they were happy to display their chameleon-like fans in all of their mystery.

I was careful to avoid Miss Pidey as I crept past her home to reach the crepe myrtle tree who has lost her blossoms and most of her foliage revealing the critters who make their homes on her bark.  This is an earlier photograph of her, but she was out repairing damage to her web from a recent storm on this day.  As I write this, she is no longer with me.  Romero apparently spied her web when he was applying plant food last week.  I forgot to tell him that she had lifetime rights to her home.

I have no idea what kinds of critters live here.  I suspect that they have grown up and moved away, however, since their homes look deserted now.  I suppose they know that the bark will separate from the tree,  and their homes will be destroyed with it so they arrange their occupancy accordingly.

I never saw this critter while he lived in his round house.  I only noticed the ruins after he went away.  If I remember, I will ask Romero what kind of creature builds such a house.

The unusual and really long-lasting blossoms of the bromeliad interest me.  This blossom has been on the plant for several months.  The blossoms die in stages eventually losing all of their pink and blue leaving a flat parchment.  I leave the blossoms on the plant until they separate from it because I enjoy watching them change appearance and catch the dried trumpet “bases” that you see here.  The tale of my love affair with the Trumpet Vine continues…

Of course, I can never resist taking a shot of the Queen Palm trunk.  She fascinates me too.  This area of the trunk is colorful.  The bark is the most interesting part of the tree.  The fronds at the top are rather ordinary compared to the varied textures and colors of the trunk.

This yellow hibiscus lives down the path between my house and Boy’s house.  My favorites are the double pink ones.  My daughter likes the single yellows.  I admit that I said some disparaging stuff about the yellows when she planted them.  Now, when I walk past them, their lovely single blossoms gaze at me in silent rebuke.  Somehow, I have come to see a kind of simple symmetry in their faces that I do not see in the showy double-pinks.  My apologies to the Yellows…  This old girl is fading, but she’s pretty still.

Staghorn Ferns hang in the pergola.  They are among my favorite plants.  I like the way the base clings to anything it finds in its effort to anchor the leaves.  The new base “anchor” is a tender-looking, slightly fuzzy, silver-gray that matures into a dried leaf that has the appearance of an ancient plant.  The tones and shapes and texture of these bases are fascinating as they grow old.  The simplicity of their role in the life of the plant is lovely.

Of course, I can never pass by Miss Lily without stopping to try, once again, to capture her.  She is my garden nemesis, as you know.  Today, I am blinded by the sun, struggling to squint through the viewfinder, cursing my glaucoma and cataracts, my tremor and her elusive skeleton.  At the end, I squatted on the ground at her eye level and laughed.  I imagined Miss Lily laughing too.  She is such a coy lady!

My beloved Trumpet Vine is in hibernation already, but her feelers are always out and on the move in their never-ending quest to dominate the world of the Pergola.  Your eyes are fine.  The photograph is slightly fuzzy.  Some of the runners are as big as small tree limbs.  They worm their way between the open spaces of the pergola framework in a perennial climb to the top where they display their  trumpets from spring to fall every year.  Their invasion is destructive.  They will … eventually … destroy the pergola on which they depend.  I am reminded of the human parallels.  I am conflicted about the destruction in progress before me, but I have made an uneasy peace with the Trumpet.

Buds hide everywhere.  The magical thing about them is that you have to look for them.  I laughed when I saw this one looking as if the Pygmy Date Palm had grown a very strange blossom.  Of course, a branch of the Hibiscus had simply grown up through the palm frond.  I am always delighted when something in the garden surprises me.

I enjoy the Pygmy Date palms that grow outside my screened porch.  In my part of the world, there are very few deciduous trees to produce fall color.  An occasional yellow leaf falls from the crepe myrtles onto the fronds of the Pygmy reminding me of the colorful fall leaves of my childhood.

The Pygmy Palm seed pods appear as large green spherical-shaped “fruits” which grow fat as they mature.  They break open spilling out a luxurious plume of creamy blossom-like shapes tightly attached to the collection of long stems that make up the immature seeds.

Pygmy Blooms_spray 2848x4288-001

Eventually, the outer shell of the pod dries and falls off leaving hanging stems filled with maturing berries.  These berries turn from cream to dark grape-blue and finally to hard brown seeds and eventually drop off.  I dried some of them this year since Romero pruned them away.  I found them on the ground beside the trees.  They were too pretty to discard so I kept them.

The fan palms collect the falling leaves and little acorns from the oak trees.  A fat little squirrel has a nest in an oak among the palms.  I see him collecting the acorns sometimes.

There is nothing extraordinary about this plant.  There are a number of them planted around the garden … for color… according to my daughter’s design.  I’ve forgotten the name.  They bloom from spring to frost without fail.  Somehow, I don’t pay much attention to them until I photograph one and realize that the budding blossom formations are interesting after all.

This is my daughter’s favorite landscape plant, I think.  It grows in a medium-sized, bushy form or in a taller form depending on where it is planted and how much sunlight falls on it.  The blossoms are a lemon-color or a deeper yellow depending on the same circumstances.  I never notice the plants until the blossoms appear suddenly.  I have come to appreciate them in the fall when fewer plants are blossoming.

This is a Pinta.  Another of Kelli’s favorite landscape plants.  It grows like a weed.  They are supposed to grow in a very low, rounded shape, but the ones around the jar fountain grew uncharacteristically tall.  Kelli laughs about the way our plants always grow into monstrous sizes since they receive so much food and water.  I haven’t turned on the fountain for many months.  I will do that again soon.  I like to hear the sound of the water gurgling from the fountain and falling onto the slate below.

Fountain

This is the fall garden.  Soon, the cold nights will come with their frost and ice.  The blossoming plants will not survive.  Romero will wait until they are dead and the spring is near to cut them all back to the ground.  Then the warm rains will come and they will reappear to start the cycle over again.  The winter is a quiet time as if everything in the garden has retreated inside itself waiting for the spring.  As much as I miss the Trumpet and Miss Lily and all of the blossoms, I think their absence makes their return more joyful.

Bird Bath

I started this blog last January.  That was years ago, I think.  I didn’t have the slightest notion of what a blog is.  What a wonderful time I have had with all of you.  I have visited remote and exotic parts of your worlds.  You have been kind to me.  You have welcomed me, enlightened me, entertained me, made me laugh, and befriended me in a way that I never anticipated.  Thank you.  All of you.

🙂

100 Comments on “A Holiday Walk

  1. Thank you so much for your beautiful pictures and adventures.
    Also, I was so happy you enjoyed reading my blog!
    What you share is amazing and inspiring.
    You are loved.
    ^_^

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    • I’m glad you enjoyed the walk, Fox. I am an old hermit, but I do so enjoy the folks here who are so kind to me. I started telling my little stories a year ago. I am telling them for my grandson. He is the character whose name is “Boy” in my stories. I will be following your essays. I was struck by the hardship of your young life and by your response to it. You are a strong person who has much to share. I am an old hermit who has much to remember. You are a bridge for me. Thank you.

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      • Likewise, you are a bridge for me. It’s inspiring to hear your stories and that you are doing this for your grandson. Thank you for your encouraging words. I am glad people have this ability to communicate more easily. It’s a treasure to hear about the lives of so many people. In fact, this helped me recall a story which I may have to add to my blog. Thank you again! Have an amazing night! ^_^

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  2. Just realised how much I have missed these delightful surprises from your garden. Congratulation on the anniversary George, and warmest wishes for a wonderful year ahead! It has been a pleasure ‘knowing’ you, and I look forward to more such treats 🙂

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  3. George , so nice to see you out and about in the blog world. This is a beautiful post filled with lovely photos and thoughts. I love the new design of your site; the palm frond backdrop is gorgeous.

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    • Thank you. That’s very kind of you. I don’t post very often since I am a hermit. 🙂 I’m happy that you enjoyed my flowers. I will visit soon. Thanks for following too.

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  4. just stopping in to say hello, sweet george…i haven’t seen you in a very long while and guess i missed this post unless i am above me in this loooong list of commenters! these are such gorgeous photos. how are you feeling? i know you have had some health challenges. it seems to be going around. and i just happened to see you over on Anash’s blog, whom i’ve just had the good juju to meet. what a wonderfully uplifting experience to read his story and see his pinky move. YAY! ok enough of this…come and say hello, my friend. much love to you, linda xox

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    • I love the WP community too. Such kind and generous and talented people. Being a part of it has been one of the real pleasures of my life. I haven’t looked back through your posts, but I think I’d find that you’ve expanded your reach a great deal. Your photography is really good too. I have to come back when I can stay awhile. My mouth literally watered at the sight of the bread pudding and the beans! I smiled at that. I also tried to hint to my daughter about making the bread pudding. (On Facebook) I sent her to your blog in the desperate hope that she might feed her old mother. You think? Have a really good 2013, Amy! Thanks for taking the folksy garden tour with me!

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  5. This is simply wonderful.

    I appreciate that I’ve gotten to know you and have been able to experience your talents, nurturing and sense of humor. I like that you’re a straight shooter. And kind.

    Happy New Year to you and your family, and to your sweet creatures.

    Elisa

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    • What can I say, Elisa? You are familiar to me in a way that almost nobody else is. I always felt as if we grew up in the same place. That it would be okay if my photographs weren’t very good. You’d get the idea and we’d laugh about the rest! Your photographs and your voice have surprised and delighted me. Your work is good. Really good. We’re all going to have a happy new year. All year. Thank you, Elisa. Really, thank you.

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      • You’re really really welcome. And you’re photographs ARE very good, and I’ve learned so much from you. I’m stubborn though, I do my own thing and I’m sure people wonder what the heck I’m doing with my settings. And now there’s a new thing where wordpress lists the camera settings used in your photographs. How embarrassing…now everyone knows that I’m a hack. A good hack, but a hack!! I just google mapped Victoria, Texas and saw that you’re near the coast, but not too far from Houston. This summer my second and last child is off to California to start college, and I’m warning you, I might just hunt you down! Take care, and good-night.
        Elisa

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    • Happy New Year to you, beautiful Nia! This is going to be a good year of all of us. I just know it! Thank you for always encouraging me. I’m looking forward to finally holding “The Cats of Istanbul” in my hands and reading their stories. 🙂

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  6. George, this is my first stop on my return and what an incredible feast. I am utterly swept away by these images. An absolutely beautiful post. So sad to read the news of Miss Pidey. It’s a wonderful shot you have of her and her lovely web. Love the Hibiscus Bud and Queen Palm Trunk. The Pigmy Palm Seed Pod and the resulting dried berries are fascinating! Great shots both!! Such a wonderful series. I’m so happy to see this post! Happy New Year!

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    • Lemony, you know that you would be the last one to get a response from me. I always save you for last … when I think I’m going to have time to get my brain in focus. Never happens! 😉 I haven’t been enthusiastic about anything I’ve seen lately for some reason. I think I have to take a drive down to the coast to inspire me. I’ve about exhausted my store of stuff to photograph here in my Hermit House. I enjoyed my walk at Thanksgiving. Since then, we’ve had some cold, and miserable weather here. Some of the plants struggle on, but it’s really going to be hibernation time soon. I look forward to the spring. Your recent pond photos are phenomenal, Lemony! I love them! What really fascinates me is your eye. I think you have to be open to discovery to recognize it.

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  7. An absolutely beautiful series of photos of natural things – you have a great eye for beauty. I like “secrets hidden in plain sight” – that’s absolutely true – and those of us that can see them are very, very privileged! Adrian

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    • Well, Adrian, you tricked me. How will I ever know it’s you with this new Gravatar? You must change it back this instant! 🙂

      Thank you for your kind appraisal of my photographs. I appreciate your taking the time to visit here and to tell me about it. Yes, there is so much beauty all around us. The garden looks drab at first glance this time of the year, but there is always something to see when I wander around looking for it. I have always been very childlike in my curiosity about the details of everything. Now that I am old, I think I see them more clearly than ever. Life is indeed good. 🙂

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  8. Thanks for sharing this walk in the garden and reminding us that beauty comes in all stages of life. Best wishes. 🙂

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    • You know, I see more beauty at my age now than I ever noticed before. Perhaps it’s because I only see what I want to see … a luxury I never had when I was younger. I do only the things I want to do. If I want to stare at a flower all day, I stare at a flower all day. I wish that experience for everybody on the planet at least for once in their lives. How can anybody ever be bored with so much to see? Thanks, Joseph.

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  9. Amazing pictures. What I love is that you capture unusual things. I would never think about capturing e.g. that something on the photo under a spider and its web. And your descriptions make it more real, like you were there, lookinh at those things. You have wonderful blog 🙂

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    • I’ve always been curious, Ewa. Nosy, my mother said. She was also fond of reminding me that curiosity killed the cat… I think I see the world in details. A good many years ago now, I decided to throw out anything in my house that I didn’t like to look at. Even a pot lid if it didn’t appeal to me in some way. I did just that. Now, I have nothing around me that I don’t enjoy looking at. Even the smallest object has to go if I find it ugly. I didn’t realize how easy that is to do or how much improved my life would become. Try it. Such a simple thing, but we don’t think to do it. Thank you, Ewa. I’m happy that you like my blog. Have a wonderful new year. 🙂

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  10. Dear George,
    I have missed you! I loved taking a walk with you through your garden, and am struck anew by your keen eye, and the wise words you use to give each picture context and meaning. You were one of my very first blogging friends–it has taken me to wonderful far-off places, brought the world to my doorstep, and introduced me to wonderful people like you. I have so appreciated knowing you! Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

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    • Naomi … the traveler who so intimidated and fascinated me at first visit. I always remember the first post I saw there. The tomb. I have never wanted to travel and fiercely resist it much to my daughter’s chagrin. The world looks better in photographs. I discovered that when I lived for a number of months in Ansbach, Germany. I was nineteen and hardly appreciated anything outside of my egocentric world, but I continue to think that very same thing. I love reading about your adventures and seeing the photographs … from my hermit house. 🙂 I thought you were a seasoned blogger when I met you. Obviously, you were a seasoned ‘everything else’ including a writer since your blog felt that way. I just saw an email notice telling me that you and Eli told stories at the museum. I will be over to find out about it. Thanks, Naomi, it’s been really unbelievable that you might find my little world interesting enough to come back for visits! That makes me smile. Have a wonderful New Year!

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      • Dear George,
        You are such a fine storyteller, as well as a talented photographer. After my first visit to your blog, I knew I had found a winner. I am always torn between my garden and nesting instinct, and my love of travel, so I kind of consider myself a homebody too, most of the time. So good to hear from you! Thanks for the visit.

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    • Carissa! I don’t visit this blog much … obviously. I missed your encouraging comment. That’s generous of you. I love photographing things around me, but I am shaky now so I have to accept what I get. 🙂 Everybody is kind to me about it though. Thank you very much. 🙂

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    • Thank you very much, Lynne. I enjoy every season in the garden. It is cold now and lots of the plants are “hibernating”, but there are interesting things to see always. Happy New Year to you!

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  11. Enjoyed the fruits of your walk – it takes a pretty clever eye to see all these things, and a good bit of skill to catch the photos!Suspect that the passion of the photographer is a factor as well! i’m pretty fond of hibiscus. wondering what i’ll have to do to nurse my two indoor varietals back to health, and perhaps coax a few winter blooms to brighten my winter blues?

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    • Well, Daisy, I think they probably need more light. Food, water and light. They don’t much like it indoors, I think. Try putting them in your garage if you have windows there. If the temperature drops below fifty, they’ll shed their leaves though. I can’t grow them indoors because I don’t have enough light. I would plant them in the spring. Hibiscus plants are readily available and inexpensive enough to replace every year if they freeze.

      Thanks for sharing the walk with me. I wander around snapping photos all the time in the garden. A visitor told me once that she liked my photos although most of them were of flowers! I still smile about that compliment. The ARE mostly flowers. But, I’m an old hermit so I photograph what I see. Maybe I’ll post photos of all of my kids at Micky D’s next. I see them every day for my iced coffee…. 😉

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  12. Did you find me or did I find you? No matter… I just love coming here to see what you’ve done next, it is always beautiful, like today for instance!

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    • Lynda, I see you in my reader, I think. I saw you visiting my angel too. I dunno’ … as I said, I’m too afflicted by the Mad Cow to remember. Thank you for coming over to see my garden photos! Now that you mention it, I’m on my way over to peek in on you! 🙂

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    • Leanne, please forgive me for neglecting my lessons at your blog! I keep telling myself that I really have to get over there to try to learn at least a bit about what I’m trying to do. I bought the D5100 based on your evaluation and photos. I smiled at myself when I ordered it since I know that no camera on earth will produce the results that you get in my hand. But, I think it will be a few generations ahead of my D300 and it is cheaper than most of my lenses so nothing lost there. I read that the D5100 was selling in Europe and Australia far more than anywhere else. I wonder why?

      Actually, the garden is pretty much the same or it was until the freeze last week. Many of the flowers and flowering shrubs blossom late into the fall and winter here since it is so warm. They’ll freeze during the next couple of months though. I miss my trumpet vine, but it will come back to life in the spring. You have so many birds in Australia. Do you have them where you are and do you ever photograph them? I follow an FB page of Australian birds that is unbelievable. The birds alone are reason enough to live there!

      Thank you for the visit and the kind comment, Leanne. Have a great New Year! 🙂

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      • That is wonderful George, I really look forward to hearing what you think of it and how you find it. I hope you will love it.
        We do have lots of birds, some are very strange. I live near a large wetlands and parklands so we often get some wonderful birds in our garden. I don’t photograph then, I don’t have the right gear to do that.

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        • Oh, I wish you could photograph them! I’m sure I’ll like the new camera. I’ll post some photos when I get it! You can tell me if it’s better than the old D300! 🙂

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  13. Informative, entertaining, beautifully photographed, well said, pretty for my eyes, … this was an incredibly enjoyable Post. Thank you. George. I know this took you a lot of time and effort, and it seems to me, a loving effort. Thank you!

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  14. What a lovely garden tour! Very refreshing and lush. I’m trying to keep houseplants for the first time in order to deal with winter and I so miss all the outside plants, trees and grasses. Now I feel revived! Thank you for your wonderful photos and engaging walk around.

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    • I hope your house plants do well. Light, food and water … remember. 😉 I don’t have enough indoor light to grow most house plants so I stick to plants on the screened porch or in the garden. Why in the world did I buy a house without a sunny window? Oh, yes, it was next door to my grandson…

      Thanks for taking the long tour. Your kind comments made me smile too. I must visit a place called “47whitebuffalo”. What an intriguing title.
      Have a great New Year!

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  15. Thanks for another stroll in your world. It has been a good year, hasn’t it? Thanks for your support to an old crone. You have been an inspiration to me as we both learned something new – blogging! Peace and love to you for 2013!

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    • Yes, it has been a good year, Jo Nell. We both learned a great deal, I’m sure. Since I am the quintessential hermit, I particularly enjoy my travels here on WP. To say that I do not travel well is an understatement. I hate it. I actually left town once recently, my first in over three years, to have lunch in Houston. Now, I have to go back to visit an old friend there since I told her about it! 🙂

      I always appreciate your encouragement. I guess old crones need to support each other! And, yes, we’re going to enjoy 2013 just as much as we enjoyed this year. Have a great New Year! See you on the other side…

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    • Thank you, Gail. I finally got a picture of Miss Pidey. Her friend crawled onto my arm the next time I got near her. I was keeping an eye on her and didn’t see the friend. About gave me a stroke on the spot! There are lots of those tiny spiders this year everywhere. I am working on the award that you so kindly passed on to me. 🙂 Soon, I promise.

      Happy New Year to you and the family too!

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  16. Hi there George! I’ve missed you! I was just thinking about you the other day. I’ve also missed seeing your work! We, as a species, may take honest beauty for granted when we’re given a steady diet of it, but wow… we sure notice it’s absence when it’s gone. Thank you for this treat. Merry Christmas and the happiest of New Years to you.

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    • Ah, Alex, always so kind to me … from the very first. Thank you.

      What are your plans for 2013? I keep expecting to hear that you are on the road again! Have a great New Year. You got me interested in space stuff this year. Fascinating. Thanks for that too!

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    • Celestine! I have missed you too! How could I fail to check in with the literary lady of Ghana? I laughed at myself and my ignorance of African geography as I read my latest favorite book, “Half of a Yellow Sun”. I kept thinking that you live in Nigeria! The characters in that book became so real to me that I am destined to measure any future denizen of the entire continent by them! If you haven’t read it already, do so immediately. 🙂 I was struck by the fact that I had no idea about the revolution going on when I was finishing my undergraduate degree and typically clueless about the world. Perhaps, it isn’t too late for me to catch that last train? Thank you for visiting me today and keeping up with me all year! Bless you.

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  17. Your Holiday Walk was quite enjoyable. I’ve been thinking about you. I think your I identified plant looks like lantana, which I love because it grows wild, no care needed, beautiful blossoms , etc. I brought several from Westhoff and transplanted them at my Cuero home. Amazing how they thrive.

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    • There are new varieties of them now. Mother used to grow the old fashioned one. I had some at the old house too, but I never really liked it because it grows like a weed! I kind of like it here since, as you said, it survives and returns each year. Have a good Christmas! Thanks for stopping by! 🙂

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  18. These are such amazing photographs!!! I always enjoy the commentary as much as the photos too.

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    • Thanks, Linda. I forgot “Lantana”. I can never remember that plant. Have a really good trip to Santa Fe! Take a few pictures of the light there on the mountains. That’s what I remember about the place.

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  19. Good morning, dear George…how nice to walk through your garden again…I love your words as you describe the plants, as they have their personalities and wonders…and I believe the plant is called a “Lantana,” the one whose name you have forgotten…they come in many colors, as you know…bright spots in your Southwestern garden. Wishing you well, my friend….

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    • Thank you, Scott. Yes, it is “Lantana”. Mother always grew some of the old-fashioned plants back when there weren’t so many varieties, I think. About a hundred years ago… 😉
      This year has drifted over a lifetime for me. The early posts seem enveloped in the mist of history now. Is that a result of aging? Or does my child’s wide-eyed curiosity leave history in the dustbin? I have been delighted and amazed by your own creative energy this year. I hope I live long enough to see the book! Have a wonderful Christmas!

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      • This has been a very full year, George…with the present and the past, I believe…and your child’s wide-eyed curiosity is probably still a good thing, it is to me, anyway.

        Thank you for your very kind words about my posts…and I hope you’re around to see the book, as well. 🙂

        I hope you have a wonderful Christmas, too, George…you make my heart smile.

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  20. What a nice walk with you through your garden. I loved how you narrated this post and told us what you were thinking with each photograph. I really like the look of your jar fountain, too.

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    • White Lady, you are one of the first bloggers that I remember. I still know you by the boots… I think about you as a “real” person here. You write well, you know. You are braver than you were at first. Your voice is strong now without the hesitation that I sensed at first. As your voice grows, mine diminishes. I often feel almost inarticulate. 🙂 Thank you for visiting my garden. Really. 🙂

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      • I love my cowboy boots! It’s my first pair. I get to be a tall person when I wear them! I think about you as a ‘real’ person, too, George. I like listening to your voice – it’s sincere and down-to-earth. I like that you can take your camera and take a photograph of something you find beauty in – where maybe somebody else wouldn’t notice it… you post it out here for us to see – and we see it through YOUR eyes and recognize the beauty, too. That’s pretty darn cool!

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  21. George, this was one impressive collection of colorful, textural images that were, well, delicious! Thanks for finally releasing after letting it brew for a year! 🙂

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    • Thank you, Lorna. Ha Ha! I love it … “brewing for a year”. Hey, I don’t have many of those brewings left in me. It’s good to welcome old friends like you to my little Hermit House. One visitor told me that she liked my blog even though the pictures were mostly of my garden. I found that entirely charming! I still chuckle about it. Yep, I don’t “get out much” as they say. But, I travel every day to exotic parts of the world that interest and inspire me. And then there is Lorna, the quintessential “Woman of a Thousand Faces”. You do so remind me of Eleanor Parker! You are the definitive modern “Queen” of the Roundtable in the Cloud! Have a wonderful Christmas!

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  22. Hi George … glad to see you (and your wonderful pictures) back after the long silence. So many colors and textures – you’ve got a good eye. I don’t know if I’ve ever determined where you are … Florida perhaps? Anyway … good to have you back. D

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    • I live in Victoria, Texas. I moved here from North Carolina in 1976 with no intention of staying more than a couple of years, but here I am thirty-six years later having evolved (devolved ?) into an old hermit. I like my life and my hermit house so I suppose I’ll keep company with my old garden gargoyle friend to the end. 🙂 Thanks for stopping by to visit. I am sending my best wishes for a wonderful holiday to my pioneer friends in Pairodox Farm!

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  23. Wonderful to see you back George, and to wander through your autumnal garden together. Look forward to seeing more of you soon, in the meantime best wishes for Christmas and a joyous and healthy 2013. 🙂

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  24. George
    Welcome back. It’s been a while. Hope things are OK. And since you mention the holidays, I want to wish you a Merry Xmas and Happy New Year.

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    • Hello Victor! It’s good to see you! I see some of your photo posts, but I haven’t visited in awhile. I’m coming, I promise! I have lots of catching up to do. Will you be in KSA for the holidays? I assume so. I have to find out what your beautiful children are up to. Thanks for stopping by. Have a great holiday and a FUN new year! 🙂

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      • George
        Thanks for visiting and catching up. Things are well. Been working and enjoying the world. There are annoyances which make the good things so much more to savor. All in all it’s been a year different from any other. But most of my years are like that. I’m glad to look back and say they have never been boring. And I’m fortunate to look back now and have many things to remind me and to have many things to look forward to. You be well too. All the best.

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  25. WOW! How beautiful and amazing all of them. I miss your photography always. Thank you dear George, Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Love, nia

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    • Hello Nia! It is good to see you face! I have missed you. I have to return to Istanbul to check on the cats! Thank you for coming to see me. Have a wonderful holiday season! Much love to you too! 🙂

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  26. You have some beautiful pictures here, and it looks like a very nice walk. How nice that you’ve enjoyed blogging. It’s been a pleasure getting to know you and what interests you.

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    • Thank you, Shimon. You are always so kind to visit and to encourage me. I enjoy your blog very much. Your posts are thoughtful, reasoned and filled with information and history. Of course,the photographs are superb. I love Nechama too, you know. 🙂

      Like

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