The Star Wars Cowboy

When Boy was little, his parents assembled a fort in his yard.  He was excited.  He was a little afraid.  The fort was very tall, and he was very small.

dsc_3284

Soon enough and with considerable encouragement, he mastered the climb to the top of his newly discovered world.

Charlie climgs into the Fort I_Snapseed

The Fort became Boy’s little kingdom.  He popped up halting any intruder who dared to set foot on the pathway near the fort.

Cowboy in Tree House

Countless gun battles ensued between Granny Gringo and the Star Wars Cowboy.

Boy shooting from lookout

One day while Granny wasn’t paying attention, Boy grew older.  The fort lost its magic.  The sounds of ferocious gun battles waged against the forces of evil disappeared for good.  The old Fort stood abandoned.

Fort Abandoned

Little Boy had moved on to other wondrous discoveries in a wider world.  The magic telescope stared absently at the sky waiting for another little Star Wars Cowboy, perhaps.

Telescope

The guns are silent now.  No little Cowboy scales the wall to the lookout tower.

Rock Wall

The squirrels and the birds come and go with abandon.  The only trace of the little Cowboy is a broken six-shooter left behind in the lookout tower.

Broken six shooter

Time and the changing seasons have assaulted the old Fort.  A broken step, a crack here and there appear unnoticed.  The reign of the Cowboy Kingdom is nearing its end.  With it, the glorious summer days of epic battles will become distant memories.

Broken Step on ladder

Only the wind sweeps the leaves from the fort now.

Fort Tower Floor

Boy’s dog watched, still and silent, as I climbed around the fort.  His curious eyes followed me as if to ask why even I was there.

Max

The Cowboy Kingdom is fading into the stuff of dreams.  Only the photographs and the memories will remain as proof that there really was a Star Wars Cowboy and his sidekick, Granny Gringo, who loved him.

113 Comments on “The Star Wars Cowboy

    • Dunno how I missed this, Rick, but I appreciate your visit! I was thinking about you and the Burmese Pythons in the swamp just yesterday! 🙂

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  1. What a lovely story teller you are George..oh the lovely days when i used to climb trees and win huge battles and save earth ..lol
    hmm the old fortress looks sad
    beautiful pics
    sending love and hey hug the cute woof one from me 🙂

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    • Soma! I replied to your sweet comment the other day. I suppose I failed to hit “post”. I do that more often than I’d like to admit, I’m afraid. I’m glad you liked Boy’s story. I write this blog for him so that he can hear my voice after I’m gone. How are things where you are? A lot of tension and division in my country, as I’m sure you know. I think about you often. 🙂

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    • Resa, I remember your Gravatar from early on when I saw it on blogs. It is such a wonderful portrait, I think. Thank you for the visit and your really nice comment. 🙂

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  2. All I can say is wow, but I suppose I need to say a little more to explain myself These pictures were incredible, and your story truly powerful. You are truly talented with words and the capability to illicit deep emotions from your readers. Thank you so much for sharing your story 🙂

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    • Thank you, Cambria. I’m glad that you liked my little story of Boy when he was a baby cheeks. Fewer words come to me now that I am old. But, I do love to take the photographs. My stories are folksy tales of how life is here with me. I’m always happy when other folks like to visit and hear about my life. Come back anytime. It’s nice to see you! 🙂

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    • Yes, they are wonderful little creatures, Amy. I discovered that when my only child, a daughter, had my only grandchild, a boy. Thank you for coming to visit. 🙂

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  3. Pingback: Birds of a Feather Under one Aviary » LEANNE COLE Photography

    • Hi, Luciana! Thank you for visiting my little cowboy story. I have to figure out how to pass along all of the awards. I’m old and slow, you know, but I’ll get there. You are so kind to remember me in that way. I also have to download “The Curse of Troy”. I enjoyed “Aphrodite’s Curse” a great deal. I’m looking forward to “Troy”!

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      • You’re welcome, and really there’s no time limit to these awards. 🙂
        I hope you enjoy the story. I had fun writing it and how it flowed.
        Take care George.

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    • Thank you, Sylvia. I guess it’s rather obvious that I adore that little cowboy who has grown to over five feet tall, is in the fourth grade now, and on to greater adventures! What fun they are, as you know from Elyse! How old is she now?

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      • Well Elyse is my granddaughter’s friend, and we were at her party in December. I have 5 darling grandchildren with ages ranging from 2 – 17 years.

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        • I declare that I recall seeing her name before today when I was visiting. I suppose I just gave you another grandchild to add to the other five! 🙂 Thanks for telling me.

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  4. This was deeply moving. I’m a sentimental guy anyway (still the tearless sort), but this story hit me like a ton of bricks.
    The style reminds me a little of “The Giving Tree”.
    Years do go by too quickly, and you’ve just reminded me of that. I love life like it is with my dear wife and children; I loved life like it was with my Papa and his horses.
    Still, after having been given such happiness, I’m hopeful that I love what life has in store next.

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    • Seeing that open-faced, smiling boy in your Gravatar, I can assure you that you will love every moment of your life with your family. Yep, we wish we could freeze moments in time with our children, but we cannot. That’s what makes life the glorious process that it is. I am eager to go with Boy into the future as far as I am able, and I am happy when I revisit our time together when he was my “Baby Cheeks” too. Life is bittersweet, I reckon. We find what we search for. Happiness is a gift you give to yourself, and you will find happiness!

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  5. Oh George, what a beautiful post! And such evocative photos!
    I could relate to every word……our older one is twelve and I miss that little ‘cowboy’ too 🙂

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    • Sorry it took me so long to reply. I’m a bit unhinged lately. 😉 Yes, we miss the babies, but the big-boy years are so thrilling as we watch them grow and expand. I am astounded at every stage of development and amazed by the sheer volume of information these little guys absorb and learn to use. It’s fascinating. Boy will always be that little cowboy to me, of course. 🙂 It’s good to see you. Thanks for coming to see me.

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    • Thank you, Carissa. I’m happy that you liked my story. I wasn’t a soccer mom and I’m not a cookie-baker grandmother, but I do love having the time to do nothing except enjoy both my daughter and my grandson now. You are too young to be a grandmother yet!

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    • Yep, Scott, life is filled with joy and sadness. I am a bit sad to lose the baby Boy, but I feel equal delight and joy in every stage of his growth. What a wonderful thing to be able to share his adventures. Grandparents are lucky folks indeed! I’m happy that you liked the story. Thank you.

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  6. Howdy pardner! You’ve got to be the best Granny Gringo in East Texas…and surely the apple of your Grandson’s eye. I hold on to every word of your posts about him, and still see an uncanny resemblance between the two of you. Your relationship with him will keep you on your game, thats for sure. Oh, how I’d love to see you during your English teaching days, and practicing social work. What a gift you’ve been, and continue to be! More stories please!

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    • I’m in South Texas. Victoria. Boy is very much like his mother. He looks like both of them, but he walks like his dad and has the same mannerisms. He already helps me with my iPhone and anything mechanical or technical. We do have a good time together. You always make me feel good about my folksy stories. They are for Boy, you know. 🙂 Thank you, Elisa. One day, you will have your very own “Boy”. Don’t forget to write the stories for him too.

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  7. George, what a delightful post. I’ve told you many times before what a wonderful writer you are. And here you’ve told such a captivating story, and your photographs that accompany it are marvelous. C is so lucky to have you in his life. What a treasure these memories will be for him.

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    • I started writing this blog for him, Lemony. I keep writing it for him. When we are dead, there will be as many interpretations of who we were as there are people who knew us. I want him to hear his granny’s voice when he is grown up. Your kindness encourages me to keep posting. Thank you. 🙂

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  8. Your photographs are so full of light and warmth even in the absence of Boy. You have a wonderful lightness of touch in your storytelling. This is really beautiful and right, George. Do you have a “follow by email” button on your blog?

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    • Thank you, Richard. My world is full of light and warmth. I am a very lucky old woman. I added the widget just for you. I am fascinated by your street portraits. I was happy to find them all in one link. They are every bit as good as the famous portrait photographers’ work in your ability to capture the personality and the essential character of your subjects. And, you do it on the street within the limitations of the elements and the constraints of time. I was just looking at a post of a list of the great portrait photographers (http://tinyurl.com/aekc5ly). I’m certain you’re familiar with all of them, but I wasn’t familiar with some of them. I wondered how they would have performed under similarly uncontrollable circumstances!

      I have to tell you that I always remember your name because I associate it with the inimitable Richard Quest! The similarity ends with the name, of course. 😉

      I appreciate your interest in my folksy, personal stories. You are a good boy, Richard. My kind of kid. You can see.

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  9. Pingback: …things I Loved! Week of Jan 13th – Jan 19th 2013 « …things I LOVE!

  10. Knowing Charlie and seeing all the items, objects and living things in this photo, a whole new perspective has opened up after reading this.

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    • I don’t quite understand, but I do know that you took the first photographs of Baby C after he came home from the hospital. Do you remember the cute text you added to the photo of him looking over Kelli’s shoulder? “I drank the whole thing”. At least, that’s what I recall that it said. 🙂

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  11. What a beautiful person you are George. I absolutely adored this post. I smiled, felt sad and remembered my own Grandma who was such a joy and inspiration in my life. I miss her so much. You invoked all those feelings and memories with your words and photographs – your writer’s voice is very strong.

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    • I never realized how wonderful it would be to have a grandchild. Boy and his parents left last night to spend the weekend at the ranch property that they’re developing two hours away. He came running back to tell me they were leaving and to give me a kiss and say he’d call me. I have had the luxury of being with Boy since he was born. I live next door, you know. Every grandparent should have such a wonderful opportunity to enjoy the little ones. I have been fascinated and delighted at every stage of his growing up. When I read your stories of the children, I always think how lucky they are to have you. I believe we can help the children to escape the Box. I really do. Thank you, WL.

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      • You are so sweet to me! I just read at Coastal’s place that you were an English teacher! I bet you were magical!

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        • HaHa. I was unconventional to say the least, but I had a marvelous old principal who adored me and let me do whatever I wanted. It was fun. I left after my first group graduated. I still remember those kids and wonder where they are. I was beside myself with joy when I was able to coax really good writing from some of those rough country boys. We read books and we wrote essays. I only wanted them to “see” the world outside of the chicken slaughterhouse where most of them would end up. They begged all the time to hear me recite the Prologue to the Canterbury Tales in Middle English! We had fun. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QE0MtENfOMU) 🙂

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    • Thank you, Leanne. I appreciate that. A nice fellow, Walter Hampson, came to visit me looking for your train track edit. You provide such an important series of tutorials, you know. If only I could use Photoshop… 🙂 I am astounded on a regular basis with the transformations you achieve in your work!

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  12. you made me cry. dug up the memory of taking down the swingset in my backyard, after my children were off being ‘tweens’ and it was just back there… looking lonely. i figured i’d be better off putting it out of its misery. this was a beautiful tale of time. thank you. now i gotta go blow my nose!

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    • As long as you aren’t blowing your nose from flu! It’s creeping all over our town. Yep, I get downright sentimental when I remember baby Boy. A fellow blogger (from Texas near here) asked how her followers would characterize their own blogs. I said mine was folksy and personal. She agreed. I laughed when I posted this. It doesn’t get folksier than this! Thanks for the visit, daisyfae. I gotta come on around and find out what you’ve been doing, I guess. You’ve been around here as long as I’ve been doing this so I know that face wherever I see it. Don’t screw me up and change it. I’m way too absent minded to keep up with folks changing their looks on me! 🙂

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  13. George….I LOVE this one!! The pictures are awesome and the story is so cool. I predict that one day in years to come there will be a grown and handsome man. He will have a beautiful wife and children. He will look back and read this blog and see the pictures and a tear will come to his eye just as a smile comes to his lips. He will be remembering the Star Wars Cowboy and the grandmother that loved him….and he will know that her wisdom…her touch….her spirit played a huge part in making him the who he is.

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    • Thank you, Sue. You are always so kind and supportive. I appreciate that. I hope he remembers how much fun we had. I wonder when his parents plan to take that thing down! I think it has served its purpose. As “daisyfae” said, it looks lonely. 🙂 Kelli came over tonight with a big box filled with books with photos and captions that I had printed for the first couple of years after Charlie was born. We really laughed about some of the photos. So did Charlie. It’s nice to remember. Thanks again for coming by! 🙂

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    • Yep, he can roll those eyes like his mother too! Tickles me. I’ve so enjoyed seeing the photos of you as a baby girl. So cute with the sweetest little cheeks. I bet they got pinched often back then. 🙂 Thanks for visiting, RoSy. You’re always here, and I appreciate it!

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  14. I came across your blog in a round-a-bout way. I was following Leanne Cole’s blog and her service of critique in which you had commented that you had posted on your blog a critique she had done for you. A quick Goggle search lead me to your blog. (phew) now that’s out of the way). I’ve still to see the critique, but I was so impressed with your use of photos and simple words to tell an effective story on the fleeting of childhood. So much so I shared the link (something I very rarely do). My complements Mr Weaver on your tale.

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    • Hello, Walter. Glad to meet you. Leanne is a very talented photographer and graphics editor too. She did a remarkable job of editing my sad photo of the railroad track. I titled the thing “Epic Fail” when I posted it initially on my other blog. It was fun to see what she did to transform it so I decided to post the finished photo along with her description of what she did to it. The link is on this page at the bottom “Bloggers Helping Bloggers”. (http://tinyurl.com/ajqkww8)

      Thank you for the compliment on my little story. I’m happy that you liked it. I am a seventy-year-old woman, by the way. I should make up a woman’s name to use here, I suppose, so folks will know. Sorry for the confusion. I tell all in my “About” page. 🙂 Thanks again.

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      • Apologies George – on the Mr… hangs head…. Susan, my partner will rib me for this until the end of time 🙂

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  15. Hi George, I am Joey (Marks wife and the cuter one of the duo). So glad you found us and our blog. Love what you’ve done here with this sentimental journey. I’m a big sop for sentimental although mine tend to run more to the nature side of things, as you might have already gathered. Marks is the darkroom genius and responsible for the wonderful tones you see on our images. Me, I just love to take pictures and find things, like you so rightly said, that most people overlook. Both of us love to go out in our woods and find amazing root formations, trees surviving against all odds, and the odd wildlife that we encounter, all gets snapped on film. Then we head to our wet darkroom where we develop our film and then find the best ways to print and display our art. Thank you so much for visiting us. We look forward to seeing more of your wonderful work. You, sir, have a flair for the dramatic. Love it. 😉

    Joey

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    • Joey, I’m smiling because I am accustomed to the confusion about who I am too. I used to receive catalogs of shoes for men addressed to Mr. George Weaver. Once I was ticketed by the police for having a tail light out on one of our big trucks. The citation read “Male”. I was interested in your names since it is not immediately clear who is Joey and who is Marks. Often people called me “Dean” and called my husband “George”. Given the choice, I would have guessed that “Dean” was the more likely choice for the woman too. The “About” page here describes who I really am. 🙂

      I can’t tell you how excited I am to have found your photographs! The human life parallels in your images of the natural world are immediately apparent. Your focus on the hidden details of the life of growing things fascinates me. I was recently looking at the Crepe Myrtles and Wax Myrtles here. I realized that even the process of new growth scars the tree and looks downright painful. I thought of posting those photos, but I figured folks would think I’d morphed into a hopeless tree huger in my old age! Yes, I am the quintessential Drama Queen, I’m afraid.

      I look forward to delving into your images!

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      • Sorry George, “Drama Queen” it is. I stand corrected. I am so sorry but you’re right didn’t even give it a thought. Off course, the name Joey, isn’t always a girls name either, so I understand the confusion. I’m so glad you didn’t take offense. Both Marks and I have family all over the Carolinas, as well as here in Florida. We’re both tree huggers, as is probably apparent if you’ve delved into our site at length. Sometimes I ask both Marks and myself, do I concentrate too much on the same thing? We both have a tendency to stick with what we love. After all how else can you develop a true passion and convey that to others if not portraying something you love? So glad to have met you, albeit, virtually. Looking forward to more meaningful communication in the days to come.

        Joey

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        • I am delighted to learn that you have relatives living in the Carolinas. I no longer have much contact with my relatives from there, but North Carolina is a beautiful state, and we always loved the South Carolina beaches. I was fascinated by the Carolina Low Country and the language that is still spoken there, I believe. Gullah. I grew up playing in the woods. I don’t think we ever forget that experience. I have watched a large dormitory being constructed adjacent to the McDonald’s where I get my iced coffee every day. I have no idea how many board feet of lumber they’ve already used, but it’s a huge number. I wonder all the time why they don’t use steel. I suppose lumber is still cheaper. It just seems primitive somehow to me now. I do not think that there is such a thing as concentrating too much on a subject. The more you study and photograph anything, the better your work becomes, I believe. I want to return to study your work. My first impression is that it is superb. Thank you for your interest in the record that I am creating here for my grandson. 🙂

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  16. You have done an excellent job of telling a story with words and photos! I almost cried into my coffee and I remembered my only grandson – now 21 – and the the precious time I have had with him – and still do! Aren’t we lucky grandmothers? Boy is very lucky too! The photos are outstanding.

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    • Thank you Jo Nell. Now that I am older, I have slowed enough to really enjoy and appreciate the moment. How fast they morph into little adults! I love every stage of his life though. I’ve been so lucky to have been with him since he was born. Kelli and I were talking about the photos this morning. Once, I had a book printed of photos of him with a running narrative underneath each photo. I had forgotten about it. I was delighted to find out that she has what she said are thousands of photos of him on CDs. I was always hovering over him with my camera! To describe me as a doting grandmother is a definitive understatement. I’m happy that you liked my sentimental little story. (Another of my folksy tales. I grinned about our evaluation of my blog when I posted this.) We really are two crones together in this effort! 🙂

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  17. I have just bought my soon to be 40 year old son a Star Wars pop up book for his birthday. He was a Star Wars boy and now he is a lovely man…where did the time go?

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    • I know. Who knew the years would disappear without notice? I bought one of the old Star Wars pop-up books for Charlie when he was little. He was fascinated by Luke Skywalker and Darth Vader. The puppies chewed many of the characters when they found them on the floor. Every little boy’s perfect fantasy world. And woe is the person who fails to look for the tiny Star Wars Lego parts lying in wait for a bare foot. Thank you for stopping to read my little story. 🙂

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  18. And just like that I fall in love with you all over again. Wow! How wondrous life is, and how brilliant you are at illustrating this. Today my heart was stolen by The Star Wars Cowboy and a photographer/story teller named George.

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    • Alex, you know I’m a real sap for Boy. I’m the least sentimental old woman around, but the mere mention of Boy drops me into instant Maudlin Mode. I laugh at myself when I think of how many books I have stopped reading when I discovered such sentimentality. Oh, how disgusting I thought they were. Ha! Life has a way of proving you to be a real fake, doesn’t it? I do love that little boy. He delights me at every age. I have been the luckiest of people to have been with him since he was born. I live next door with joining back yards, you know. He comes and goes as does his puppy Max. How absolutely blessed can one difficult old woman be? 🙂 Thank you, Alex. I always know you are there.

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  19. What a great way to tell the story of how our precious little Charlie so quickly turned into our precious big Charlie!! The photos were really great.

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    • Thanks, Linda. He is Big Charlie now! Tonight, I will see his painting of Monet’s “Bridge” at the open house. Yesterday, he announced that I “have to go” with him to see it. I can’t believe sometimes how fast he grew up. You and Hazel have to come back soon. 🙂

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    • Hello, Marks! I’m delighted to meet you guys. I took a quick trip to your blog, and I am astounded by the images there. I agree with your philosophy about photography. There is just something about analogue images that cannot be captured in digital format. Zeroes and ones just don’t produce the same images! Thank you for the visit. I appreciate your taking the time to read my sentimental little story. 🙂

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  20. Oh my gosh George … that one was a real tear jerker! As I look over the comments and your responses to them I see your motivation. We all have misgivings about the way in which we spent our ‘early’ life. Those who say they don’t aren’t being honest. If we only knew then what we know now … right? Despite our mistakes I think our kids turned out AOK. However, Joanna and I are both looking forward to grandchildren … although I think that will be sometime coming. Thanks for the great images and the wonderful, thought-provoking, prose. D

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    • Yes, our kids did turn into the adults that we hoped they would. My daughter moved easily into our business and takes care of me too. She and her husband took over the business several years ago. To say that they are my guardians is an understatement. I am the least sentimental of old women until Boy is mentioned. Then, I sink up to my eyeballs in pure Maudlin Mode. I am unflinchingly disparaging of sentimentality in anybody’s writing, including my own, but I am helpless when I attempt to write about Boy or his mother. They are my Achilles Heel.

      Ah, grandchildren. What a wonderful experience your “Boy” will have with you and Joanna! If I were still around, how I would chuckle at your inability to resist your own version of Maudlin Mode. You provided my morning chuckle! Thank you.

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  21. Oh my dear what a beautiful story, I felt in my heart. And amazing photographs hit me as your words… Thank you dear George, Blessing and Happiness to you all, love, nia

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  22. Very beautiful and poignant story even made more so by the wonderful photogrpahs, George. I will treasure every moment with my boys. 🙂 Thank you so much for sharing this.

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    • Thank you, Celestine. They grow up so very fast. Perhaps, I am acutely aware of that little phenomenon at my age. I wasn’t aware of it when my equally wonderful daughter was Boy’s age. We need to pause along the way to enjoy our children in the moment. And to record them in pictures. I know you are loving every moment with the boys. They are fortunate to have a mother like you, for sure. 🙂

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    • Thank you, Shimon. I am happy that you liked my sentimental journey here. At the mention of Boy, I go into instant Maudlin Mode I’m afraid. I enjoyed your photography post, and I’m looking forward to more of them.

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  23. I saw a saying recently “the hand prints get higher and higher up the wall… then they disappear..”
    Children grow up so fast… before we know it the years have slipped by…cherish every moment 🙂

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    • What an apt observation. The hand prints do disappear all too soon. I am acutely aware of the passing of time now, and I treasure my time with Boy. All too soon, my own “hand print” will disappear! 🙂 Thanks for stopping by.

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    • Thank you, Julie. I’m happy that you enjoyed it. I didn’t realize that you wrote a book. “We’ll Be Married in Fremantle” is your book, isn’t it? I am going to buy it immediately since I have a keen interest in the world of old people as I always describe what is now my own world. I was a geriatrics social worker eons ago. I am delighted to discover your book! 🙂

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  24. Absolutely beautiful George; the individual shots, the sequence, and the narrative form a perfect whole. I will now send this to a bunch of people who will get misty eyed 7 have a catch in their throat; this emotional manipulation by proxy will make me feel somewhat less embarrassed about being misty troated and having a catch in eyes. See what you’ve done- now I am all muttled ( must be the dog). 🙂

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    • Are we getting sentimental in our old age, Joseph? I think we learn to pause just long enough to realize how very important the time we spend with the little ones is. We have time to relish the games we play. Often, I wish I had stopped to appreciate my daughter more when she was little, to have taken more photographs. Now, am acutely aware of the short time we will have with them at each stage of their lives. I am trying to collect the stories and the photographs of Boy’s childhood so that some record will be there for him when I am gone and he grows up. Often, he asks me if I will be alive when he is some age or other. He wants to know if we will do things together when he is older. I know that I won’t be here, but I encourage him to look forward to all of his dreams. For me, the past is a dream. I am never certain that it happened at all. Did I imagine it? I am happy that you like my little story. Thank you.

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      • My son let me know you got to him with this post. He is a big teddy bear at heart. With a special needs sister & older parents he has a strong sense of the passage of time. 😀

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    • Naomi, you will have your own grandchildren soon. They are such little loves. Boy only grows sweeter and more interesting as he grows older. I have been so very lucky to have been with him since he was born. We remain fast friends. You have such wonderful times ahead, Naomi! You will be the best grandmother because you are the best mother. I can imagine the fantastic stories you will share with them and the fun you will have. Thank you for sharing all of your adventures with us now!

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  25. This is beautiful George ~ so cleverly arranged, and the images are wonderful. It’s so much fun to reflect and remember – makes everything feel tangible. You ‘boy’ is 10 yo now ~ doesn’t the time just pass too quick ? I’m sure he is into new adventures now –and will include you in those as well.. he’s lucky to have A gm like you! 🙂 x RL

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    • Yes, Boy is such a sweet fellow. He always insists that Granny participate in anything he does. Just today, he ordered me to take him to an open house at his school tomorrow night. His art will be on display, and he knows how much both of us love art. He has painted his interpretation of Monet’s bridge from the painting of the bridge in the garden at Giverny. He is very excited about showing it to me. Often, now, I ask him to adjust something on my iPhone or my camera! He has been such a joy for me, and I am learning new things all the time from him now. Grandchildren are wonderful! 🙂 Thank you, Robyn. I appreciate the visit too!

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  26. What a beautiful and touching tribute you’ve written. it shall be treasured, i am sure. my gson is also now 10 tho we do not live near enough for me and already, that special time is over. i know it in my heart and it saddens me. one cannot go back in time tho we would like to, wouldn’t we… these are beautiful images. someday you will gift them to him and he’ll love them and you as much as you do him. no doubts. xx

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    • Thank you, linda. I am lucky to have been always here with Boy since he was born. He is my only grandchild, and of course, I adore him. He was such fun as the little cowboy. I never played games with children, but I played like a real trooper with him. We hatched the most elaborate schemes to evade and defeat the invaders! I hoped nobody was listening when I contributed half the dialogue! It was serious business. Our childhood memories are wonderful. I am attempting to gather the photographs and the stories for when he grows up. I’m happy that you enjoyed this bit of our history. Thanks for visiting!

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    • Thank you, Sandee. I’m glad you enjoyed it. I love remembering that little cowboy. I smile when I remember the dead-serious plotting to get the bad guys. I never laughed either. My job was to follow orders and contribute some extra detail to the dialogue. It was such fun!

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  27. Boy was lucky to have such a dedicated sidekick in Granny Gringo, may her storytelling both in image and words echo ’round the old fort forevermore.

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    • I was lucky to have lived to play cowboy with the little Star Wars Cowboy too. It’s fun to remember it. I try to collect the photographs for when Boy grows up. Thank you for the visit and for your kindness! 🙂

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