Coffee With Regina

Hello, Friends!  I missed the entire month of April.  This post just sat there waiting for me to finish it.  I started the post to share my Iris with you.  I declare, I must have zillions of photographs of the Iris now.  I never paid the slightest attention to the old-fashioned iris.  I never really liked them.  My daughter included these plants in the landscape plan for this house primarily because of the nice, slender clumps of foliage that don’t die in the winter.  She had no idea what the blossoms might look like.  They bloomed for the first time this spring and they have delighted me.

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This bud reminded me of a little bird.  I loved him.

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As you can see, the bud base grows directly out of the side of the grass-like blade.

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I am fascinated by the growth pattern of these flowers.   The intricate architecture of the leaf that allows the bud base to grow up the leaf for a considerable distance before it pushes through the side is remarkable.

Bud-through-leaf

The photo above was taken through the screen window of my porch.  I included it because you can see the long stem of the bud base growing inside the leaf.  The bud on the right is emerging from the leaf.

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The flower above is fully opened.  The blossoms open and wilt within a day.

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In the photo above, one bud base has developed and another one is emerging from within the the same bud base.  The brown tip of it is visible underneath the blossom.

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Here, you can see the bud as it begins to unfold into a blossom.  The iris blossoms open in the mornings.  This one still has the droplets from the sprinkler system clinging to her petals.

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This iris grows to a height of about four to five feet.  The blossoms change character and color depending on the light.  The blossoms are not large, but they are dramatic.  One day, the plant is a clump of unremarkable green grass-like foliage.  Suddenly, the next morning a flurry of lovely blossoms seem to appear as if by overnight magic.  She is a thoroughly delightful plant for the careful observer.

She is a walking iris whose name is ‘Regina’ Iris (Neomarica Caerulea).  I understand that she is commonly referred to as Giant Apostle’s Iris.  We will simply call her Regina.  This spring, she has treated me to this view from my chair on the screened porch where I drink my coffee, and I thank her.  I cannot think of a more lovely companion.

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I have had a couple of little adventures since I last talked to you, but certainly nothing very exciting since I swore off robbing mosques.  I still haven’t discovered what they did with the oranges.  😉

62 Comments on “Coffee With Regina

  1. You have succeeded in doing what I have never managed to do, and this is capture the Iris. It’s a bit in the category of sunsets (referring to your earlier post) for me. I opt just to experience iris(es?) at this point. You have done wonderful work with this series. She is absolutely lovely, your Regina.

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    • Thank you, Lemony. I was able to observe the plants during all hours of the day since I can see them from my chair on the porch. Otherwise, I would have missed some of the stages of development. I think this particular variety is exceptionally interesting because of its growth pattern. I am happy that you like my photographs of her! 🙂

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  2. “she is a thoroughly delightful plant for the careful observer” – Amen! And you are just that observer! i am fond of iris – and may make a note on my calendar to plant some this autumn. i think that’s when they get planted. i’ll have to find out… beautiful tale, as always….

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    • I think you can plant this kind of iris at any time of the year. Thanks for the visit, Daisy. I’m glad you liked Regina! 🙂

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  3. Hi Mrs. Weaver. I like what you’re able to do with this Iris, despite your not being too fond of it. You are a wonderful photographer, and you should know that.
    I wonder, have you mentioned before what camera equipment you use? Well, I hope that you’re enjoying your day, and have a great week, Ma’am.

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    • Hi, Dinks I thought I chose to include EXIF on all images in Ps, but I see that it is not included here. I used a Nikon D300 for years, but recently bought a Nikon D5100. It is a cheap camera that Ken Rockwell says produces image quality as good as the D7100 so I chose it. It is well-made and has a nice balance in the hand. I can’t use a lightweight camera due to my tremor. I don’t think the camera makes a great deal of difference. I use a Nikkor 18-200mm lens with a shallow DOF for all of my close-up photos. I dropped the lens from at head level onto a slate floor and dented the outside rim of the lens, but it still works. The focus ring is a bit stiff now, but it works. 🙂

      Thank you very much for the evaluation, Dinks. I appreciate that since I know so little about the technical aspects of the craft. I point and shoot and operate by instinct, I’m afraid. I do appreciate your encouragement!

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  4. Welcome back after your hiatus! Ah the iris. She is an enigmatic creature, so full of color, texture, and curves. Very feminine…

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    • Thank you, Joshi. If you approve, the photographs must be okay. You know how much I admire your work. Thanks for taking the time to stop by and comment. It made me happy, indeed! 🙂

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  5. Great set of photographs, George! I particularly like the atmosphere you evoke with your gauzy screen door. It’s a remarkable plant – very nicely captured.

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    • Thank you, Richard. The screens are black, screen cloth with such tiny openings that I am surprised that I am able to photograph through them at all. I suppose the camera records what the eye sees, and I can see through the screen! Sometimes, if the sun is right, the screen produces a nice pattern on the subject. Thanks for stopping in to visit. I have enjoyed this remarkable plant too.

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    • I am happy to see the palm tree! I do not get notifications of your posts. When I click, I get the old blog page. Something is screwy with my following. 🙂 The last post I recall was one with your sister’s, (?) I think, paintings. Since watercolors are my favorite medium, and hers are so very good, I remembered them. Thanks for the visit. I’m glad you like the photos too. Perhaps, I can figure out what is wrong with my notifications system!

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  6. I too am glad you are back, George! Do you have a tripod for those shaky days? Sometimes that is the only way I can get a good shot. I have to say, that your photographs today are wonderful! I have never heard of a walking iris before. I think I need at least one for the new Farmlet. Don’t you agree?

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    • Lynda! I am sorry to hear that you have a tremor. I understand from my neurologist that there are more people who have tremors of one sort or another than you’d ever imagine. Mine is familial and will only worsen as I get older. The VR lens and image stabilization help. I have a tripod, but I am too disorganized to use it. I can imagine that I’d break a hip trying to set it up under or behind whatever I’m climbing into. 🙂 Nothing I ever want to photograph seems to be in a sensible location! Thanks for the visit. Yes, you must have at least one of the Regina, walking iris clumps!

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  7. This is so weird, we must have been on the same wavelength today, because I was thinking of the name Iris, and how beautiful it is in its simplicity.
    The flower is not so simple. I enjoyed your series of photographs, and not to pick favorites, I did love the seventh one…I’m always drawn to the soft focus. Love it. I’m sorry to hear your hand tremors have been bothering you, although you’d never know it from the crispness of your pics! Take good care, George!
    Elisa

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    • This iris grows in a big clump of really nice foliage. You’d like it. I’m glad you liked the pics. I like soft focus too. Usually, that means out-of for me. I am managing with the VR lens and the image stabilization in the camera along with a fast shutter speed and lots of light. I hit about one in ten. 🙂 No chance of using my iPhone. I had Charlie standing on his toes trying to reach a magnolia blossom with the phone the other day. He got somewhere in the neighborhood of the blossom by guessing! I am hoping that the new mouse for handicapped people will help with the flying cursor! Thanks, Elisa. 🙂

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    • Thanks, Leanne. I never had iris plants before Kelli installed these. This iris is particularly nice because of the big clumps of handsome foliage. You should plant some in your garden. They like partial shade with morning sun.

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  8. What gorgeous photos! Irises grow wild around here and I love them.

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    • Wow! Growing wild would be really nice. It must be an ancient plant since there are so many varieties of it. Thanks for stopping in to visit! 🙂

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    • Thank you, Elena. I’m happy that you like them. I have enjoyed the blossoms since since they are among the first plants to bloom in the spring. I appreciate your stopping in to visit! 🙂

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    • I never noticed them much until Kelli installed these. I have enjoyed them so much this spring. I suppose because I actually looked at them! Thanks, Gail.

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  9. A gorgeous series George. Iris is one of my favourite flowers, but I have never seen any that grows that tall!
    Missed you too 🙂

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    • Madhu! I am happy to see that beautiful face! Where are you adventuring next? I have to come by to find out. I think of you often. I haven’t been able to post much because of my tremors, but I hope the new mouse for handicapped people will help. Thanks for stopping by to visit. You always remember me and I appreciate it. 🙂

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  10. Hey, George! I have missed you, too! I enjoyed the pictures of your iris, very nice indeed! I have some of these in my yard too that just started blooming and then of all things we get some crazy cold weather today! We actually have a little sleet mixed in with the rain…(I’m not sure how this will affect all my flowers…)

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    • Well, if the sleet doesn’t damage the plants and the temperature doesn’t stay low for too many hours, they should be fine. I have enjoyed these blossoms. I never thought I liked the iris. My mother thought “blue plants” were an unnatural color. She did have some old-fashioned iris though. I never planted them because of the odd fan-shaped growth pattern of the foliage. I suppose I have time now to look at them. 🙂 I have really enjoyed your stories. They are so well-written and funny. Just fine work, WH.

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    • Thanks, Celestine. How goes it in Ghana? I am so senile that I can’t recall what I intended to ask you a couple of weeks ago. Something that I heard on the news, but it’s flown out of my head. 🙂 I hope you are all rested from the months of stressful stuff going on. Thanks for stopping by. Good to see you! 🙂

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    • Thanks, Soma. I really have enjoyed these flowers. The first time they bloomed since we got them. The buds remind me of little birds when they start to open. I have enjoyed you on FB too. You must message me all about your family and what you are doing! I love hearing from you! 🙂

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    • Thank you, Carissa. I talk. Too much sometimes. But I do love having folks to share my photos and stuff with. People here are so very friendly and accepting. I never imagined having the opportunity to talk to and to visit the photographs and stories of other people around the world. My mother said that she would like to have been able to live long enough to enjoy what she knew technology would offer. And she would have loved this. Thanks for your kind words. 🙂

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  11. The iris pictures are beautiful! I love those plants but I don’t have any. I’ll have to look into whether we can grow them here. It’s nice to see another posting from you. We’re off to California tomorrow!

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    • Thanks, Linda. I hope you have a wonderful time and take LOTS of photos! 🙂 I think you could have this iris in Denton. Of course, you get ground frost, don’t you? That might kill the rhizomes. Otherwise, they are hardy and require no special care. Let me know how the trip goes!

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    • Thank you, LC. I’m glad that you enjoyed the photos. I have truly enjoyed these blossoms. They are the first Iris blossoms that I ever had. Thanks for stopping in to visit too! 🙂

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    • Hello, Victor! I saw that Julia is still in KSA? She is a good diver. 🙂 I have to catch up on your adventures soon. How long is your stay? Thanks for stopping in to visit. I am still in awe of your market photograph! I shared it on FB and am going to require a print when you can arrange it. 🙂

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  12. An early-morning feast for the eyes. Do you listen to NPR George? Have you ever heard of the CD collection of stories called NPR’s driveway moments? This is a collection of NPR reports which kept listeners idling in their cars in their driveways, riveted, such that they couldn’t leave the car until the report was done. I had my coffee and bagel in front of me on my desk and couldn’t take a sip or a bite until I had seen each of your images and read every one of your words. I had a George moment right here at my desk! Thanks. D

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    • You made me chuckle, Farmer. You are such an absolute delight. I got distracted from your last post in which you talked about how we only click a few posts back. I thought it was a great idea to bring some of the great posts from earlier in your blog back. I remember the early ones. Especially one of a barn that looked for all the world like a church. Some of those posts were really wonderful with such good photography too. I have to return to read them. I am so happy that you liked my Regina blossoms. It is difficult for me to get a post together now, but I have ordered a mouse for handicapped people. I hope it works for me. No, I have not heard NPR’s driveway moments, but I will check it out. Thank you for always being so enthusiastic and encouraging. 🙂

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  13. i always loved to have a clump or ten of iris in my gardens when i lived in the usa; every year when they bloomed, i pulled out the watercolors and captured their likeness.. bearded iris, dutch iris, louisiana iris – ah, i loved them all!

    there’s a ‘walking iris’ that’s plentiful in latin america, and someone gave me a start of those about a month ago. i look forward to when they start blooming and then walking across the garden!

    thanks for sharing your own treasures, and i’m glad that you’ve learned to love them!

    z

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    • You are so funny, Zeeb! You always make me laugh. “…a clump or ten”. I never had these plants and didn’t think I liked them. I like this variety at any rate. The clumps are huge with really nice foliage that doesn’t die in the winter. This “walking iris” fascinates me because of it’s growth pattern. It’s simply an ingenious design! She likes partial shade with lots of light and morning sun. I have some in a more shaded area that don’t do as well as those with good morning sun. I read about the Louisiana iris and the other varieties that you mentioned. I have to get more varieties after I read more about them. Thanks for stopping in for a visit. 🙂

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  14. These are marvelous photos, George. I enjoy every one. What color, and composition. It seems to me that our prickly pears grow much the same way, with flowers and the fruit emerging from the leaves of the plant. And I think I remember more examples, but don’t know their names in English. A very interesting and enjoyable post.

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    • Thank you very much, Shimon. I am pleased that you like the photographs. I loved watching the iris and trying to capture her many moods. Such fun I had with her. There are many varieties of the iris. I think it is a very old plant. And, yes, the prickly pear fruit and blossoms do emerge from the leaf. We have them everywhere here. I am up way too late, of course, but I am glad to read your comment before I am forced to nap a bit! 🙂

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  15. Thank you for sharing. Iris’s have deep meaning for me and I always enjoy feasting my eyes on the, or the word in any shape or form….so tha k yu again

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  16. I am so glad to hear you dear George, I really miss to see you in this blogging world. How beautiful your photographs… how beautiful. I would never get bored with them, they are all different shots even the same subject… The colours, the composition and the contrast, everything is amazing and so impressive… Thank you, have a nice weekend, love, nia

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    • Ah, sweet Nia! Thank you for visiting! I haven’t been around too much lately. My tremor is worse so it is more difficult for me to post. The rewards of old age, I suppose. I do post more often on The Fuzzy Foto since I post a single photographs there. I have seen some wonderful photographs that you posted. I hope the construction is finished where you are. I will be around soon. Thank you again, Nia. Have a good weekend. 🙂

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