The Curvaceous Cactus

The sun was shining.  It was warm.

I headed off to the garden center

To find plants for the Garden Bones

Lilies and Hibiscus and Ferns

What I bought was a Coral Cactus

Grown by Costa Farms

In Florida

The directions said to water her infrequently

Keep her in bright light

Suitable for a desk

I wondered whose desk is in high-noon-desert light?

She’s sitting on the porch ledge against the screen

Maybe I’ll remember to take her outside for some of that bright light

Before I soak her feet and her head falls off…

🙂

60 Comments on “The Curvaceous Cactus

  1. A friend gifted me one of these about 5 years ago. I love it, and it seems to be doing well. It’s gotten so big, I’m afraid it will need to be re-potted, as it’s getting top heavy.
    Does anyone have experience with these particular cacti and this issue ?
    Thanks

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  2. Hello again, Your blog looks fantastic! I love it! I used this theme, but never customised it. I will keep it in mind for when I do another change. I love that cactus too, it is really pretty.

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    • I think you’re right. It does qualify to illustrate the chaos theory! Ha-ha. I should have thought of that. Thanks, Richard. Glad you like it.

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  3. George, this is exquisite! One of my favorite photo series. I love the colors and textures, but I appreciate how you presented your photographs. That’s my favorite part of blog posting, the layout, for some reason. That’s why I keep changing themes, to find the perfect layout presentation. I didn’t read the other comments, did anyone compare this cactus to a caterpillar? You never fail to surprise us, George. Love it. I hope you are doing well. I do think of you often. xoxoxo
    elisa
    🙂

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    • Hi, Elisa! I’m glad you liked the post. Nobody mentioned a caterpillar, but the thought did strike me too. It’s a very rigid plant with such tiny blossoms that you can’t really see them with the naked eye. An oddity. I keep struggling with themes too. I bought three themes, but I don’t use any of them, of course. I keep coming back to this old one. I like your current theme. I am doing well. I just cannot seem to get my act together.
      🙂 Thanks, Elisa!

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    • Thank you, Elena! It is a bit alien, I think. The thing fascinates me. Chuckle… I hope it survives my inept care! 🙂 Thanks for stopping by to visit!

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  4. WOW! I haven’t seen it before, it is amazing, amazing and your photographs are so beautiful. You are very creative dear George, Thank you, love, nia

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    • Hi, Nia! I never saw a cactus like this one either. I’m glad you like the photos of it. And thank you for your generous compliment. 🙂

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    • Thank you. I think some of our land plants have their origins in the sea. I had fun snapping the curves of the cactus. It is a strange plant. Thanks for stopping by, Patti!

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  5. Oh wow ! …. I had never seen a cactus with such form. It is very unusual…
    The photos are perfect, you caught the detail of the curves that make this cactus different.

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    • Hi, Oonga! Thank you. It is an unique cactus, I think. Of course, I’m not familiar with cacti in all of their strange forms. This one appealed to me because of its curves and pretty colors. I appreciate the visit and your kind comment. 🙂

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  6. So cool! Great photos! I love the colors – they’re like the colors of little succulents – there used to be a dry section of a greenhouse at Wave Hill, a public garden in NYC, which was filled with little succulents and cacti – in spite of the spines on some of them, the overall look was softly pastel, soothing – the curves and soft greens and pinks all working together, like what you saw – and couldn’t resist! 🙂 (And isn’t it funny that one gets an undersea impression from a dry land plant!)

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    • You know, that is precisely my reaction to cacti and succulents too. They always look like sea life to me. What a dichotomy this desert plant from the sea! We only know of five percent of the ocean depths. I’m positive that we will encounter these and many more strange living shapes from which all life has emerged. There is a Mission 31 in which Fabian Cousteau is involved to do just that. The aquanauts will live there in an undersea habitat for thirty days. It’s located somewhere in the Florida Keys. We can follow it via ocean cam. I’d love to visit Wave Hill! Is it warmer in Seattle now? Finally, it’s warm here…to stay, I hope! Thanks for stopping in to visit, Lynn.

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    • Thank you, Amy. I’m glad you liked the Curvaceous One. 🙂 I had a lot of fun trying to photograph her. I hope I can manage to keep her in good health. Thanks, too, for stopping by to visit us here in the Garden!

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    • Sweetheart Rob! You’re back to encourage me! 🙂 Your gorgeous images and words are essential sustenance for a lot of folks, you know. I’ll be over shortly to see what you’re up to since your return to the land of the hale and hearty! I suspect that I share your philosophy, and that’s rare for me to discover in anybody. Thank you so much for always visiting my posts and for your wonderful appreciation of what I do here. 🙂

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      • Not back as yet.. still suffering.. they say the lungs can take up to three months to repair themselves, till then I’m a bit useless… got energy for very little .. don’t even sit in front of computer for long as the sitting puts pressure on the collapsed lung and is painful… oh well we will come right with time…

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    • Thank you so much, Linda. I was instantly taken with this strange plant. I’m glad you enjoyed the photos. I got a real chuckle visiting your trip to the whimsy farm! 🙂 I appreciate your dropping by to visit us! It’s finally spring, at least I think it is. I’ve stopped thinking that it will be cold when I awake the next day. Next thing you know, I’ll be whining about the Texas heat and humidity. The Curvaceous Girl should like it, however, if she makes it until July… Wish me luck in my new caretaker role!

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  7. Wow, the gallery makes it look like a marvelous dragon-creature slithering through the different panes. Wonderful shots. So interesting! (And ouch, my mouth!!!) 😉 Good luck staving off the collapsing of the head–the cactus’s that is. 😉

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    • Ha-ha! At least, this cactus doesn’t have those awful hair-like needle spines that you can’t get out of your finger…mouth. The collapse-of-the-head is imminent, I’m afraid. Chuckle… You make me laugh. I thought about you as I was posting the slithering dragon. 😉

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    • Hi, Shimon! When I started looking for information on the Jewish Passover, I ran across this interesting piece that made me aware of the significance of the old Negro spirituals in the Jewish tradition. I never thought of that connection before I read this: http://goo.gl/SAj67E written by a black classical singer who encountered the song for the first time at his first Seder. “Go Down Moses”, sung by Louis Armstrong in 1921: http://goo.gl/hQZmJy
      Wishing you a beautiful Passover, Shimon.

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  8. She is a true beauty but you sound like me. I either water too much and they die or I don’t water enough and they die. I hope this one doesn’t lose her head though. Your shots are glossy gardening magazine quality.

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    • Hi, rose. I’m holding out hope against this one’s demise… Thank you for the wonderful compliment on my photos. I’m experimenting with the macro lens and filters. That’s fun although I’m not too familiar with it. I do appreciate your evaluation of my efforts here! 🙂

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    • Thanks for stopping by, Christine. I thought it was a most interesting and strange plant. It’s very rigid, but it doesn’t have those awful tiny needle-like cactus “hairs” on it. I hope I don’t over or under water it. 🙂

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    • Ha-ha! I hope so too. I’ll feel just awful if I rot the stalk and cause her head to “collapse from its own weight” as the warning predicted. I never read such dire warnings on a house plant before in my entire life. That actually was on their website description of the cactus. I’m trying to enjoy her without thinking about the apocalyptic ending… Chuckle… Thanks for stopping by, Jo!

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    • Thanks, Narelle! Glad you smiled; it takes far fewer muscles to smile than it does to frown! The coral cactus is an interesting plant. I hope I don’t over-water it and cause its head to collapse! 🙂 I appreciate the visit. Thanks!

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    • Hi, Cardinal. It’s a very strange and unusual cactus. I can’t grow them, but I liked this one. It came with a bizarre warning: water it too much and it’s stalk will rot and the top will collapse… Now, I’m waiting for its head to fall off! 🙂 It’s two plants. The top is grafted onto the stalk. Thanks for stopping by. See you soon! 🙂

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