Iris

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Post-Horizintal

~For Glenda Henry~

47 Comments on “Iris

  1. I couldn’t seem to leave a comment on your tulips. This series of posts is really well done. I especially enjoyed the abstracts. There, you really were outstanding.

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  2. I love irises. The ones you took pictures of remind me of ones my grandmother had all around her house. You made me smile today, George!

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    • Yes, I saw them around everywhere when I was growing up, too. They are hardy old perennials that were included in every southern garden, I think. Glad they made you smile! πŸ™‚

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    • Thanks, Gail. The Regina Walking Iris is a dramatic plant. And photogenic, to boot. Glad you enjoyed the photos of her! πŸ™‚

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  3. Absolutely wonderful images, George. I particularly like the one before last, the one with the completely plain, pale green background – I think I prefer the overall lightness. Adrian

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    • Hi, Adrian! The last two were shot in the morning light. The first ones were in the deep shade of late afternoon. The one with the green background is the result of the angle of the photo and the very shallow DOF. There were no objects in the background, only space and morning light. It’s amazing what different moods we get with the changing light. Thanks, Adrian. I’m delighted that you like my interpretation of Miss Regina, the Walking Iris! πŸ™‚

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    • Chuckle… Thank you, Suzanne. This variety of the Iris is pretty and photogenic too. The way the blossoms just spring from the edges of the leaves really does fascinate me. Thanks for stopping by to visit me! πŸ™‚

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      • You’re welcome…..The iris is my favorite flower! I have a glass insert of iris’s in a window in our bedroom.

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  4. Are you sure you didn’t just imagine such beautiful shapes? What a testament to the power of evolution!

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    • Ha-ha! I never imagined an iris of any kind in my entire life. Actually, they never appealed to me. I saw them everywhere around old houses when I was growing up. They seem an ancient plant to me. I became interested in this variety when Kelli included them in the plantings for the new house. The growth pattern interests me. Yes, it is a testament to the power of evolution. And, as a bonus, the blossoms are pretty. Thanks, Shimon.

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  5. Wow. Well, here is the Iris. Such a difficult flower to photograph–you know how I’ve struggled with it and given up πŸ˜‰ . Such grace you’ve captured in these images. Beautiful dramatic, shadowy, and fluid movement of the first few shots. The fifth image has such a clarity to the color. How do you achieve that bright, blurred–but unmuddied–green background?

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    • Well, you were trying to photograph an entirely different Iris. The large, more fluffy blossoms are not as photogenic as these small, deeply-colored, more well-defined blossoms that have such nice leaves. The one with the green background is the result of the angle of the shot and the shallow DOF. There were no objects in the background. Only open space and sunlight. That accounts for the color. It was morning. An unusual time of day for me to be up and out and about! πŸ˜‰ The dark images were shot in the deep shade of late afternoon. I’m delighted that you like the images. Thank you, Lemony!

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    • Hi, Linda! It’s the Regina from last year except that these plants are new this year. I never thought much about the Iris, but I’ve come to really enjoy them outside the porch where I see the new blossoms as they appear on the leaves. I just thought the Iris was an old-fashioned plant with large blossoms that I didn’t much like. These really are hardy perennials with pretty, smaller blossoms. I’m glad you like the photos. The first ones were shot when the shade was deep on that side of the porch. The last ones were shot in the morning light. That’s the difference. πŸ™‚

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    • Well, Miss Robin! You changed shoes! Now, how in the world am I going to keep up with where you are? Chuckle. I loved the plaid sneaker shoes. Put them back on your pretty feet! πŸ˜‰ Oh, and I’m delighted that you like Miss Regina!

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    • Thank you, D. I never really paid much attention to the Iris since it is an old species that I saw everywhere around houses when I was a child. It was only when Kelli included them in the planting for the new house that I started actually seeing them as fascinating plants. Our appreciation of lots of stuff changes with life experiences and age, I think.

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    • Hi, Rob, my head cheerleader! πŸ™‚ Thanks. The iris is an interesting flower, for sure. I am always fascinated by the way the blossoms break through the sides of the leaves like magic!

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    • Hi, Crazy Guy with the cutest Gravatar! I’m delighted that you like Regine, The Walking Iris! πŸ™‚
      Thanks for stopping by to visit an old lady!

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    • Thanks, Marianne. The iris is a fascinating, old plant with many varieties. This is the Regina Walking Iris. The blossoms appear, as if by magic, from the sides of the broad leaves! I appreciate you stopping in to visit me, too, Marianne! πŸ™‚

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    • Thank you, Nia. The iris is a beautiful and intricate flower. The leaves are broad and sturdy and the blossoms burst from the sides of the leaves. That fascinates me. You should grow the iris. They are perennial, so the foliage is attractive all year. πŸ™‚ Thank you for visiting me, too! πŸ™‚

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    • Thanks, Narelle! The iris is a strange and striking flower. It’s somehow an ancient one. Since the blossom bases develop out of the sides of the broad leaves, it is a fascinating plant. Thank you for stopping by to visit! πŸ™‚

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    • Hi, Meredith! It isn’t either one. I don’t know the name. It looks like a walking iris. The foliage is bluish green and very wide and tall. The blossoms are small. The curled petals in the center are not like either the Wandering or the Louisiana. I have to find out from the nursery, I suppose. Thanks for reminding me. I posted last year on them too: https://georgeweaver.wordpress.com/2013/05/03/coffee-with-regina/ They really did better last year than this year. I think not enough sunlight. Thanks for stopping by to visit! πŸ™‚

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    • You know, it has to be the walking iris since the buds appear out of the leaf, and they appear to be “wandering up the leaf”. Chuckle…

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  6. Thank you my dear friend, George! The iris is gorgeous, such a stunning and unusual color. Your photography is awesome! Is this in your garden? So very nice of u to think of me. Drove by your house Tuesday or Wednesday late morning, but shutters weren’t open,and saw no lights, so I let you sleep. Will come by again sometime. Glenda

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    • You are very welcome, Glenda! I thought about you when I snapped the photos. Your favorite flower. Yes, the iris is outside the porch. Where did the years go? Now, I’m old. I can’t imagine what happened! Chuckle… You have to wake me up next time. πŸ™‚

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